ADA AND CANYON COUNTY RESIDENTIAL AND COMMERCIAL GROWTH

CHAPTER X - Appendix E to H Part II of VII

 

ADA COUNTY (BOISE MSA) COMMERCIAL GROWTH 2000 THROUGH PRESENT

CHAPTER X - APPENDIX E

 

 

Ada County Profile http://www.idoc.state.id.us/idcomm/pdfs/Ada.pdf

 

City of Boise Home Page http://www.cityofboise.org

 

Meridian Home Page  http://www.ci.meridian.id.us

 

Eagle Home Page http://www.eagleidaho.com

 

Kuna Home Page http://www.governet.net/ID/CI/KUN/home.cfm

 

Idaho City Profile http://www.idoc.state.id.us/idcomm/compro.html

 

Idaho County Profiles - Statistical descriptions of Idaho counties from an economic development perspective

http://www.idoc.state.id.us/idcomm/cntypro.html

 

Idaho Data Center http://www.idoc.state.id.us/Data/dtacntr.html

 

Idaho Businesses on the Web

http://www.accessidaho.org/working/bonweb.html

 

Although most geographic regions of the United States economy appear to be growing well, there are some areas that offer unusual opportunities for sustained growth, with factors that indicate a thriving local economy for years to come.  The Boise, Idaho region of the northwest is such an area.  Boise and Nampa are positioned on the leading edge of Idaho’s dramatic growth — growth projected to continue for some time to come.

 

Market conditions are solid and continue a 13-year cycle of sustained growth in the greater Boise area.  Southwestern Idaho has a population base of about 300,900, "growing at a rate substantially higher than the national average. Growing at an annual rate of 1.7%, the Census Bureau (in its 2000 census) ranked Idaho the third-fastest growing state this decade for the percentage of population and housing growth, and the Boise-Nampa urban area was ranked the fifth-fastest growing cities this decade.  Since the last official head count on April 1, 1990, Idaho’s population has grown by nearly a quarter of a million people, more than 24 percent.  Only Arizona, at just more than 30 percent, and Nevada, at more than 50 percent, has seen greater growth."

 

"The Census Bureau estimated that in July 2001 Idaho's population was 1,321,006 residents. That was an increase of about 27,053 (2.1%) from the 2000 Census. Of that increase, the Census Bureau estimated that about 3,700 (13.7%) was due to net international migration (immigrant settlement). During the same period there was a net domestic migration increase of about 10,400 from an influx of native-born residents."

Employment growth is surging in the Boise Metropolitian Statistical Area (MSA) due to renewed growth in many of the state’s high-tech markets.  Even though agriculture is in a slump 2002, in 2000 non-ag employment growth in the state was expected to slow to 2.2 to 2.6 percent pace in 2001 and 2002.  For the twelve months period ending August 2000, non-ag employment in the Boise MSA increased by close to 4.6 percent, creating 9,600 new jobs compared to the prior twelve-month period.  While this is not the 6.7 percent pace of non-ag employment growth that the Boise MSA experienced in 1993 and 1994, it remains over twice the national rate and one of the fastest growing MSA’s in the U.S.  (John Church, Principal, Idaho Economics, at the Boise Metro Chamber’s Economic Outlook Forum 2000).

 

July 2000 the Gross Domestic Product (GDP) estimation for the next 5 years was 3.2% annually (Idaho Statesman 6/00).

 

Construction data drops in activity - Idaho Business Review (Ref. 2)

 

"Building statistics are down by double digits in Boise and around Idaho, reflecting continued economic sluggishness and a lack of new jobs.

The Boise City Construction Report for May showed a 36 percent drop in total construction value for the first five months of the year – $162.6 million compared to $252.2 million a year ago. That compares to $250.3 million for the same period of 2000, $187.6 million in 1999 and $211.9 million in ’98.

Around the state, construction value in 57 municipalities through March dropped 25 percent, to $159.5 million, according to the most recent Wells Fargo Idaho Construction Report.

Boise City Planning & Development Services Director Tim Hogland says declines in Boise construction statistics reflect a sluggish economy early this year, a growing trend toward building houses outside Boise city limits, and last year’s cyclical peak in apartment construction.

Several major projects planned in downtown Boise bode well for the future, he said. He cited plans for an additional convention building, a parking structure and commercial building on the Bannock Garage site, a major mixed-use project on Front Street near Fifth, and the University Place and Water Center projects.

Through May, Boise commercial construction value fell by 38 percent to $61.3 million, single-family housing permits declined 28 percent to 373, and permits for apartments fell 63 percent to 180 units.

Building permits declined by 12 percent through May, to 5,798. That compares to 6,539 last year, 6,984 in 2000, 6,636 in 1999 and 6,644 in ’98.

The Wells Fargo report indicated non-residential construction value dropped 20.7 percent statewide for the first quarter, to just more than $42.5 million. Alterations and repairs totaled about $27.2 million, down 29.4 percent from a year earlier.

Some 1,653 single-family homes were built in the first quarter, down 8.1 percent from a year ago.  Multi-family units totaled 305, a 57.8 percent drop.

While mortgage interest rates remain low, helping home sales, "there just aren’t any jobs being created on a statewide basis," said Kelly Matthews, Wells Fargo regional economist based in Salt Lake City.

The 8.1 percent reduction in single-family construction through March compares to the 10 percent drop that he predicted in January.

Matthews wonders if even a 10 percent reduction in new housing would be enough to maintain a balance between supply and demand, given the strong buildup of the past several years and the lack of new jobs now.

For now, Idaho home values have held up well and "there is not evidence of significant excess supply in southwest Idaho or statewide," he said.

A large portion of Idaho housing construction is occurring in Ada and Canyon counties, where home sales remain strong, Matthews said.

Southwest Idaho’s $300.7 million in total construction through March compared to $337.6 million a year earlier, a 10.9 percent drop, Wells Fargo said. Meridian kept pace with year-ago totals while Nampa, Caldwell and Twin Falls posted gains. Unincorporated parts of Ada County saw construction value fall.

North Idaho’s construction value dropped by nearly 46 percent in the first quarter to $43 million, compared to $79.6 million a year earlier. Coeur d’Alene’s $9.1 million compared to $24.4 million through March 2001.

Eastern Idaho’s $29 million total for the quarter compared to $27.9 million in 2001, a 3.9 percent gain. The Idaho Falls total grew from $6.8 million through March 2001 to nearly $11.5 million in the first quarter of this year.

Southeast Idaho posted a 35.9 percent decline, to $20.9 million compared to $32.6 million a year earlier. A bright spot was Pocatello, where first-quarter value went from $4.1 million last year to more than $5.3 million this year."  As reported by  Brad Carlson, June 17, 2002 in Idaho Construction/Business Review.      (Ref. 2) http://www.idahobusiness.net

"The state could receive more than $2 million a year for land it leases to alternative energy companies. A federal study has concluded that Idaho owns 39,500 acres of land with winds that blow hard enough to warrant wind farms. The study says state-owned lands have the potential to produce 660 megawatts, enough juice to power 148,000 homes.

 

Operating Facilities by Renewable Energy Technology in the State of Idaho. http://www.eren.doe.gov/state_energy/opfacbytech.cfm?state=ID This table provides data of all currently tracked renewable energy facilities in the state.  Data is derived from the Renewable Plant Information System, developed at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory Renewable Electric Plant Information System. http://www.eren.doe.gov/repis

 

"Another $500,000 is going to rural areas to hire regional economic development specialists, who will work with employers interested in moving to their areas."

 

"Growth in Idaho's economy is strong even though agriculture is in a slump.  Cheap hydroelectric power rates are among the lowest in the nation. The relaxed quality of life has attracted national recognition."

 

"Signals are prominent that the family farm in Idaho has shifted to survival mode and that “some producers will be forced to leave production this year,” said Neil Meyer, University of Idaho extension economist who traveled the state last fall for meetings on “Coping with the Current Ag Economy.”

"Factors threatening the farm lifestyle are production at record levels worldwide, declining demand mostly caused by Asian economic problems, excess reserves that drive commodity prices below production costs, and continuing effects of the 1996 Freedom to Farm Act that reduces “market transition payments” over seven years until gone in the year 2003," Neil Meyer, University of Idaho extension. Economist.

"Idaho farmers got more than $262 million in direct government payments last year. The federal government spent more than $600 million on all farm programs during 2001, including the direct payments, research, loans and other programs."

"Manufacturing has recently supplanted agriculture as the most important sector of Idaho's economy. Cattle and dairy goods are among the leading agricultural products. Idaho's chief crops are potatoes (for which the state, easily the nation's largest producer, is famous), hay, wheat, peas, beans, and sugar beets. Electronic and computer equipment, processed foods, lumber, and chemicals are the major manufactured items."

 

Boise is the regional hub for government, business, cultural and transportation, making it a viable place to invest and develop. This geographic reality is evidence by the large number of fortune 500 companies having headquarters or major prescience in Boise!  The area is perfectly suited for new business growth and is attracting new businesses at a rapid rate.

According to David Birch, president of Cambridge, Mass., based Cognetics Inc., in an interview in The Wall Street Journal, 2000; “Boise is in the top 20 of 24 mid-sized cities as a hotbed for entrepreneurs.”

 

"The May 29, 2000 issue of Forbes magazine announced that Idaho ranks fifth on Forbes list of best places in the United States to do business and advance a career."

 

"The magazine ranked 200 metropolitan regions by eight business categories, including wage and salary growth, job growth and high-tech clustering.  Boise climbed from 49th in 1999 to fifth in 2001."

 

In the year 2000, Idaho was ranked sixth fastest growing state in the U.S. (John Church, Principal, Idaho Economics, at the Boise Metro Chamber’s Economic Outlook Forum 2000).

 

"The city is putting itself on the map as a center for business development, driven by a thriving high-tech industry.  Twenty years ago, Boise had eight high-tech businesses; it now has more than 400.  Spurring the growth is the success of Hewlett-Packard Co. and Micron Technology Inc. and the many local high-tech businesses that have spun off from those two giants.  The city of Boise ranked seventh in the United States for growth in high-tech industry as of the year 2000.  The Boise area is among the top 25 cities for its share of the nation’s technology economy.  The technology sector – which includes Internet, semiconductor and computer companies – employees about 20,000 people in Ada and Canyon Counties."

 

"Other factors in Boise’s high ranking include Idaho’s high level of entrepreneurial spirit; good access to capital, a strong work ethic and pro-business cooperative relationship between government and Idaho’s universities. Quality-of-life factors also played into the ranking."

 

“You can’t transport this quality of life easily,” said Ed Zimmer, chief executive officer at Electronic Controls Co., a Boise firm employing 150. “The major factor behind our growth is the quality of the talent we’ve been able to attract and retain.”

 

Preservation of the past, conservation of natural resources and traditional values maintained from generation to generation, makes the residents of Idaho well positioned for the world tomorrow.

 

“There was a time when Boiseans traveled to Portland or Seattle to shop because they could­n't find the fashion they wanted locally.  Those days are long gone.  With a growing retail scene across the Trea­sure Valley, sophisticated styles and trend-setting fashion for both women and men have come to town."  As reported by the Idaho Statesman September 24, 2000. (Ref. 1)

http://cityguide.entertainmentidaho.com/fe/Shopping/main.asp

 

"Downtown was struggling when Moore and Larry Leasure created the Marketplace from old warehouses. It was seen as a destination that would attract businesses and consumers downtown. And it figured to benefit greatly if a regional shopping mall – envisioned in downtown Boise since the 1960s – materialized nearby.  Moore and Leasure sold the development to a Chicago company for about $9.8 million. But the downtown mall never came, tenants left 8th Street Marketplace – complaining of high rents and minimal promotion – and the complex went broke.

Owners sought to reorganize through a Chapter 11 bankruptcy in the late 1980s. The development ended up in the hands of two savings and loans – which themselves got into financial trouble and were taken over by federal regulators, along with the Marketplace, in 1990.

Boise resident Al Marsden acquired it for $1.55 million, and later sold it to S-Sixteen for an undisclosed amount." As reported by by Brad Carlson.  Information obtained from an article Published in Idaho Business Review and is not the full report.  (Ref. 2)
http://www.idahobusiness.net

 

"Eighth Street Marketplace occupies 6 acres bordered by Front, Myrtle and Ninth streets, and Capitol Boulevard. The site includes four office-retail buildings and two vacant buildings totaling about 250,000 square feet."  As reported by by Brad Carlson, Idaho Business Review.
 

"8th Street Marketplace offers an old-world village shopping experience. The main building is set in an old warehouse that was renovated in 1977 into a multi-level enclosed mall. It features an eclectic blend of shops and restaurants, and, it's in the heart of Boise's burgeoning Cultural District." (Ref. 1)

 

"Thomas Kinkade Gallery appears to be the only national retail tenant. Restaurant tenants include Milford’s Fish House, Café Ole, the Kulture Klatsch and Ha’ Penny Bridge Irish Pub.

 

Occupancy peaked in 1987, after which competition emerged in the form of the Boise Towne Square mall, Clark said. Over the years, S-Sixteen has continued to make improvements to the property, redeveloped by Winston Moore in 1977."  As reported by By Brad Carlson, Idaho Business Review.  (Ref. 2)

 

"The 8th Street Marketplace recently has expanded. Other downtown boutiques include Precious Metal Arts, Decor Creations, Esse Baby and Purple Sage." (Ref. 1)

 

"S-Sixteen, the J.R. Simplot family limited partnership, hopes to sell 8th Street Marketplace, contracting with George Iliff, managing principal with Colliers International to sale the property for sale.

 

"There are more than 3 acres of parking lots – at Capitol and Front, Capitol and Myrtle, and the Foster warehouse lot at Eighth, Broad and Front streets – where multi-story buildings with parking, retail, office and possibly even residential space could be constructed." As reported by By Brad Carlson, Idaho Business Review. (Ref. 2)

 

Downtown Boise's skyline continued to change with construction expansion of an estimated 200 million dollars projected in 2000.

 

"Across the street from The 8th Street Marketplace, you'll find Faust Furniture, well known for it's velvet chaise lounges and over-stuffed giant chairs to funky glassware and knickknacks and a little slice of L.A.-style fashion boutique at Piece Unique.  For dining, the area offers the intimate European bistro and wine bar Berryhill and Co. and the area's premier vegetarian restaurant, Kulture Klatsch.

 

Boise Towne Square opened 12 years ago with 99 stores. Today, the largest mall in Idaho, Boise Town Square, boasts 200 merchants with more on the way.  The 1.33 million square feet of retail space, 95 percent of which is leased, is on the comer of Frankin Road and Milwaukee Street, just off I-84.  Boise Towne Square is the largest mall in the region, with the closest similarly sized shopping area in Portland or Salt Lake City.

 

Boise Towne Square recently underwent an expansion. The most recently added stores include Ann Taylor, Banana Republic, Gap, Limited Too and Brookstone.

 

Retail is still booming in Boise," said Cathy Sullivan, regional marketing director for the mall. "National retailers who have overlooked us in the past are now giving it the eye."

 

Down Town Boise offers a mix of boutiques and department store shopping. It stretches from the Bon Marche department store on the block between l0th and 9th streets on Idaho Street to the Dragonfly boutique at 4th and Main streets.  In between is a collection of fashion bou­tiques such as Ishi, which offers a blend of classes, ethnic flavored women's clothing, Purple Sage, with a flair for bringing lacy old fash­ioned styles into a contemporary light and Bar­bara Barbara, a long-time local favorite with a mix of kicky and comfortable contemporary styles.  Alexander Davis, in the Hoff Building at 812 Bannock St, offers a selection of men's business and casual wear.

 

For men's fashion, Alexander Davis, in the Hoff Building at 812 Bannock St., offers a selection of business and casual wear that includes Hickey Freeman, Austin Reed, Kenneth Cole and Hart Schaffner & Marks."  (Ref. 1)

 

"Scott Stewart, Patrick Laney and Gary Benoit formed the development firm Stewart Laney Benoit (SLB) in 1999 and the partners have a 20-year record in land development in Boise.  In late 1999, the company purchased 44,000-square foot Sonna Building on the northwest corner of 9th and Main streets in Boise." As reported by John Tucker of the Idaho Statesman October 6, 1999.

 

"The 9th Street Center, at 9th and Idaho streets offers sweet-smelling Lavender, with its own essential oil blends, Crabtree & Evelyn and others, connected to Kandor, which offers everything stylish for your kitchen. You can also find unique, one-of-a-kind jewelry at Perpetual Metals, R. Grey Jewelry Gallery and Michael Rogers' Precious Metal Arts.

 

The Boise shopping scene received a huge boost when Dillard's Department Store opened a new wing. The chain, based in Little Rock, Ark., beefed up Boise's designer reper­toire with lines such as DKNY, Dana Buch­man, Ellen Tracy for women, Claiborne, Perry Ellis and DKNY for men.  Since Dillard's opened in August 1998, the Bon Marche underwent a facelift and expan­sion that includes a Mac Cosmetics annex, greatly expanded clothing departments and makeup counters and a shoe department with a plethora of delicious imported shoes.

 

Other national retailers that recently joined the mall include Ann Taylor, Banana Republic, Eddie Bauer, Abercrombie & Fitch, The Dis­ney Store in the mall, and Linens N' Things and Old Navy across the parking lot.  The mall is currently 98 percent occupied, but with more stores on the way.  Those new stores will join fashion favorites such as funky Limited Express and Mr. Raggs.  The Limited and Limited Too, for kids, Victo­ria's Secret, Regis, J.C. Penny's and Sears.

 

It's not just fashion.  The mall offers Idaho specialty foods and crafts at Made in Idaho, the latest releases and your favorite classics at Sun coast Video, Music land and others.  It offers the traditional mall fare with pizza-by-the-slice, ice cream and burgers. It also of­fers national chain restaurants such as Olive Garden, Old Chicago and Sizzler.

 

Boise Factory Outlet, off of 1-84 at the Gowen Road exit, 6852 Eisenman Road, features 23 outlet shops filled with factory direct savings and "gives kids a place to play, too. While mom and dad shop, kids can slide over to the nearby Idaho IceWorld, featuring two indoor ice rinks."  On the fash­ion end you can find Coldwater Creek, Bugle Boy, Full Size Fashions, Dress Barn, Levi's Outlet-By Most, Payless Shoe Source, Carter's Children swear and Big Dog Sportswear.

 

The newest stores in this outdoor mall are American Outdoor Recreation, Coldwater Creek, Leather Loft and Kitchen Collections.

 

The outlet mall also offers house wares at Corning Revere, The Kitchen Collection and Welcome Home, a collection of home decor ac­cessories.  It's also the home of Rocky Mountain Chocolate Factory and Idaho Ice World, with year-round public skating in a National Hock­ey League regulation size rink." (Ref. 1)

 

“Other major stores that have established a presence in the Treasure Valley include Wal-Mart Stores Inc.  Wal-Mart opened large "Supercenter" stores in Caldwell, Nampa and Mountain Home in the Sumner of 2000.  It also is constructing a Supercenter in Meridian and is turning its Boise store into a 216,000-square-foot Supercenter.  The giant stores employ between 200 and 500 people.  Besides retail stores, the Treasure Valley has attracted numerous high-tech companies.

 

Wal-Mart Super Center at Glenwood and State Streets in Garden City and Fred Meyer's new store on Federal Way, with another slated to begin construction at Franklin Road and Orchard Street in 2001.  This second Fred Meyer store will replace an older neighborhood shopping mall at that location.  WinCo foods recently opened a new grocery store in Meridian, and as plans for a similar store in the Eagle area.  In addition, building permits were issued to Home Depot store on Federal Way." As reported by John Tucker of the Idaho Statesman September 24, 2000.

 

“Nearly 147,000 square feet of new retail space was added in Ada County in the first half of 2000.  The overall vacancy rate remained nearly unchanged at 6.3 percent over the same period 1999."  As reported by Commercial Report, Knipe & Knipe.

 

“The addition of many national franchise stores into the Boise Metropolitian Statistical Area (MSA) is evidence of the confidence that national corporations have in the Boise retail market.  That confidence is not surprising.  Demographics USA estimated that 1998 retail sales in the Boise MSA we’re nearly 4.7 billion.  They forecast MSA retail sales to exceed $6.6 billion by 2003, and recent figures indicate that expectation may be met.  Retail sales in 1999 approached $5.1 billion, which trends indicating a $320 million increase 2000."  As reported by Todd Boothe, General Manager, RC Willey Home Furnishings, Inc., at the Boise Metro Chamber’s Economic Outlook Forum 2000.

 

"Meridian Crossroads on the southeast corner of Eagle Road and Fairview Avenue in Meridian brings 14 acres of clothing, office supplies, outdoor goods, food and discount stores and other businesses to this fast growing city. Tenants include ShopKo, Macey's Food and Drug, Office Depot and Old Navy." (Ref. 1)

 

The Treasure Valley boasts close to a dozen large corporate headquarters, making it unique for a Community its size.  The area also is home to a growing number of small busi­nesses and startup companies.  But like business communities across the country, mergers, acquisitions and Consolidations are shaping things up.

 

Construction contractor Morrison Knudsen Corp. announced in early July 2000 that it is changing its name to Washington Group International Inc.

 

The name change came as the company ac­quired the engineering and construction divi­sion of Raytheon Engineers & Constructors, a defense and aerospace conglomerate.

 

The acquisition Creates a company that will have $5 billion a year in revenues, employ 38,000 people and be the fourth largest engi­neering and Construction company in the Unit­ed States.  Company officials said they regretted drop-ping the Morrison Knudsen name.  MK is one of Boise's oldest corporate icons, founded in 1912 by Harry Morrison and Morris Knudsen with a Couple of wheelbarrows, a string of horses and $600 they borrowed."  As reported by John Tucker of the Idaho Statesman September 24, 2000.

 

According to a survey done by the AGC, 65 percent of its 750 Idaho Members were planning to build projects at the same pace or greater in 1999.

 

Scott Stewart, Patrick Laney and Gary Benoit formed the development firm Stewart Laney Benoit (SLB) in 1999.  The partners have a 20-year record in land development in Boise.  In late 1999, the company purchased 44,000-square foot Sonna Building on the northwest corner of 9th and Main streets in Boise.

 

Area organizations are community supportive in Idaho.  Boise Family Downtown YMCS at 1050 W. State recently remolded its facility.  The project included new swimmining pools, a youth activity center, snack bar area, rooftop playground, special-needs locker rooms and lots of other new equipment.  The more than $7.5 million project added about 24,000 square feet to the facility."  As reported by Johnna Espinoza of the Idaho Statesman September 24, 2000. 

The value of building permits issued in Boise for the first three months of 2000 was nearly 30 percent below the same period in 1999, according to an Idaho Construction Report issued by First Security Corp.  During the first quarter of 2000, $10.3 million in permits were issued for commercial projects in Boise.  That compared to $14.6 million during the same period in 1999.  Since the time the construction report was printed, however, permits valued at $22.3 million for the 25-story Boise Tower project and at $25.9 million for the first phase of the Ada County Court House project were issued.  Many projects across the city also are in the process of obtaining permits to get started.  Commercial construction for August 2000 in Boise jumped 93 percent, with permits issued for $46.4 million in work.  In August 1999, there were permits issued for $24 million.  Year to date through August, commercial construction is up 58 percent, reaching approximately $204 million. As reported by John Tucker of the Idaho Statesman.

 

2000 developments announced to commence:

 

Ada County Courthouse and its $45 mil­lion commercial segment;

 

$42 million public library and $8 million southeast branch library;

 

The Family Center Retail project on Federal Way;

 

Luke’s Meridian Medical Center around Eagle Road exit on Interstate 84;

 

A $12.6 million recreation center is planned at Boise State University, which hosted the NCAA women's gymnastics finals and NCAA track finals in1999, and will host the first and second rounds of the NCAA men's basketball tournament and in 2000 hosted the women's Sweet 16.

 

A mere gener­ation ago the Boise-Borah High School Football game was the athletic event of the year.

 

Security provisions make terminal project more complex - Idaho Business Review (Ref. 2)  http://www.idahobusiness.net

 

Boise Airport terminal building and Airport Expansion: 

 

"The current project includes a 361,000-square-foot terminal building with a two-level roadway system, additional airplane space and increased parking. Layton Construction of Sandy, Utah, is building the roughly $47million terminal, Anderson said, while McAlvain Construction, Inc., Boise, is building an $8 million roadway.
 
The terminal building "seems to be basically on schedule," said Anderson, with the likely addition of about 10 contract days due to modifications of the project.

"We originally said the middle of February (for completion), and we’re still hopeful of that, but probably by mid-March at this rate," he said.

The $8 million roadway system, including an elevated roadway, "seems to be on schedule with very few change orders," said Anderson. Completion of that project is slated for early August.

The roadway will be built out "so that we can add the second part of the terminal building in front, which allows us to double the size of our ticketing and baggage claim area," Anderson said.

But the completion of these projects may be followed quickly by consideration of new expansion, since the growth in usage at the airport has been "faster than anyone anticipated," said Anderson.

The project scope was intended to meet what Anderson termed passenger level 1, "which is supposed to get us through 1.5 million annual in-plane passengers, which we’ve done."

"We’re actually down to 1.4 million because we lost about 10 percent of our traffic because of 9-11, but we pretty much built to the level we’ve already reached."

"When we started this we didn’t think we’d reach this level for another five years," he said. "But the growth just went faster than anyone predicted."

Anderson said American Eagle, Frontier and America West came aboard at the airport after the original projects were set in motion.

"We’re essentially completely full in our ticketing positions in the ticket lobby," said Anderson. In the concourses, "we’re out of room to park all of the airplanes that are here overnight on jetways, and we’re scrambling to find places for them."

"We need to evaluate whether it’s time to start building on another new concourse. When this project is completed we’ll probably either build another concourse, add more ticketing (space) or add another parking garage, or we’ll do all three. That’s looking more true than ever."  As reported by By Ken Levy, Special to IBR.  Information obtained from an article Published in Idaho Construction Review and is not the full report.  (Ref. 2)
http://www.idahobusiness.net

 

Renovation of ex-armory slated - 65-year-old WPA building to get major remodeling (Ref. 2)

 

"It’s one of the largest WPA projects secured by Tourtelette & Hummel during the 1930s." – Sandra Cavanaugh. 

 

"There were a lot of things that were so destroyed we just removed them." – Sandra Cavanaugh
 
"A non-profit theater company is raising about $7 million needed to renovate the historic Boise Armory on Reserve Street into a state-of-the-art theater complex that will feature three performance areas.

The vintage 1937 Art Deco armory was a Works Project Administration endeavor and is "an excellent representative example of Tourtelette & Hummel's Depression Era design work," said Sandra Cavanaugh, artistic director of The New Heritage Theatre Co.

"It is also significant as one of the largest WPA projects secured by Tourtelette & Hummel during the 1930s, and is one of the largest state institutional buildings designed by this firm," she said.

While TNHTC plans extensive renovations to the 47,000 square-foot interior, it intends to retain many original construction elements cited in listing the building on the register of National Historical Places in 1999."  As reported by Ken Levy, Special to the IBR.  Information obtained from an article Published June 17, 2002 in Idaho Construction Review and is not the full report.  (Ref. 2)
http://www.idahobusiness.net

 

Hedrick refocuses, negotiates as public projects dwindle - Storage units provide latest work niche - Idaho Business Review (Ref. 2)

 

"Scott Hedrick Construction Inc. located in Boise, is actively involved in Idaho's commercial growth. The Boise-based general contractor has several large public works projects to its credit as well.

Ada County and McCall projects include:

 

Boise City Fire Station No. 10, completed in 1990, the project, valued at about $1.197 million, was a joint station used by the city and the Federal Aviation Administration at the Boise Air Terminal.


Scott Hedrick Construction Inc. has been building storage units and office buildings for Avest LP, Boise. That firm is the parent company of Stor-it, and Hedrick has built numerous projects for them over the past seven years.

 

A 23 storage building complex and a building off ParkCenter Boulevard was recently completed by Hedrick for Avest LP, Boise, Hedrick said. The latter was valued at about $2.1 million. Hedrick is building more storage units for that company at Locust Grove and Fairview Avenue, and in Meridian at Ten Mile and Cherry Lane.

"(Hedrick) has built hundreds of thousands of square feet of storage for us," said Scott Weber, construction asset manager for Avest, "including 200,000 square feet at our Locust Grove, ParkCenter and Maple Grove locations."

Weber said Hedrick also built the company’s South Shore Plaza, a 5,800-square-foot office building at Lexington and ParkCenter, and a 1,300-square-foot Stor-it Plaza office suite at Maple Grove.

 

Hedrick is about to embark on a senior housing project in Eagle for Mercy Housing.

Mary Pridmore, vice president of Mercy Housing, said that project is divided into two parts: 20, two-bedroom units for low-income senior housing, funded by HUD, and 49 units of low-income senior housing funded by the HUD-sponsored Tax Credits and Home Fund.

Community Development Block Grant funds covered about $420,000 of the cost of the latter project, which consists of 30, one-bedroom units, 18, two-bedroom units plus a manager’s apartment.  Development and construction costs are valued at about $7 million, she said.

The project is going through the design review process, according to Pridmore, and Hedrick could get started on the 49-unit phase by Sept. 1.

 

Hedrick also built a 4,600-square-foot custom home in Kings Pines estates in McCall for Avest. In all, Hedrick has done about $7 million in work for Avest LP, Weber said. Additional storage sites covering hundreds of thousands of square feet are planned, said Weber.

Among his more unique private-sector projects, Hedrick is working on the McCall Ice Rink and Event Center. The $5.4 million project, funded by the Rich Sabala Foundation, is a 20,000 square-foot building with an 85-foot by 200-foot ice surface. The center includes bleachers and concessions.

"We were involved with that from the day it was conceived," said Hedrick. "We were negotiated in as construction manager and general contractor on that project."

Also in McCall, Hedrick is building an 85-room, $5.7 million Holiday Inn motel and convention center in McCall for Bob Hunt.

Hedrick also does some high-end residential construction, including a 6,000-square-foot home for Albertson’s CEO Larry Johnston and another 6,000-square-foot home for Rick Belluzzo, president of Microsoft, he said.

The company was the general contractor for the 22,000 square foot auditorium at Borah High School. Completed in September 1999, the $3.2 million complex seats 967 and has a full theater stage with curtains and theatrical lighting with catwalk.

 

Hedrick got his background and experience while working with his father, Win, as partners, beginning in 1979. By 1982, Scott had launched his own firm.

"All my experience comes from working with my dad," he said. "He had the real estate company (Hedrick & Bodine Realty), he developed a lot of subdivisions and did some commercial construction."

When father and son partnered, Scott said his goal was to do more commercial work, especially public-works projects.

The firm did about $28 million in sales in 2001, he said, and "it would appear we’ll be pretty close to that again this year."

The firm employs about 45, including four project managers and 10 field superintendents, with the balance comprised of carpenters and other professional construction personnel."   As reported by Ken Levy, Special to the IBR.  Information obtained from an article Published June 17, 2002 in Idaho Construction Review and is not the full report.  (Ref. 2)
http://www.idahobusiness.net

 

To accommodate growth at the outskirts, in 2000, the Meridian City Council commenced planning to install $8.3 million in sewer lines in coming years. 

 

"If Meridian didn't do it, Boise would do it for us and those places would be in Boise," Meridian Mayor Robert Corrie said.  "If we did nothing, we'd be surrounded by Nampa and Boise, and Meridian would be a city of small size, without the residential or commercial tax base."

 

The land southwest of Meridian is higher in elevation, making sewers more expensive.  So officials don't plan to extend pipes to these areas, and they won't see much growth.  Widening a road will suddenly prime the land along it for development.  For example, developers plan large shopping and office centers along Eagle Road.  These projects, which will generate tens of thousands of car trips, weren't feasible until the road was widened recently.

 

Meridian was once considered the bedroom community of Boise.  While people worked and played in the capital city, they lived in Meridian. ­  But that has changed.  Within the past five years, high technology businesses like Crucial Technologies, http://www.crucial.com  Jabil Circuit, http://www.jabil.com Micron Electronics http://www.micron.com Execu-Net, http://www.execunet.com  and New Western Electronics http://www.westernelectronics.com  have been calling the Western Ada County city home.  Industry officials say the city's central locati­on in the valley makes it a natural hot spot for his growth in technology-based develop­ment.  The arrival of Shopko, Fred Meyer, R.C. Willey and Home Depot have given Meridian residents little reason for traveling to Boise for they’re shopping needs.  But Meridian has a feel for its agricultural past, and its rural influence lives on.

 

"Boise-based contract manufacturer Western Electronics announced plans August 2, 2000, to double its total space and manufacturing capacity by constructing a 100,000-square-foot building on Overland Road just south of the Meridian Road interchange off Interstate 84.  The 7.5-acre parcel is part of a 35-acre parcel DBSI, a Boise-based real estate and investment entity, has majority ownership in. DBSI also owns apartment buildings and develops commercial centers, including two planned on opposite corners of Glenwood Street in the Garden City-northwest Boise area.

 

In addition to increasing production capacity with more space and equipment, the new Meridian building will have a gym and day-care facility, said Reeve. Parts of the new building will have two stories.

 

BRS Architects and McAlvain Construction, both Boise, are designer and builder, respectively, of the tilt-up concrete structure. A project cost estimate was not released.

 

Western Electronics occupies a total of 55,000 square feet of leased space in buildings on 43rd Street in Garden City and on Karcher Road in Nampa. The company also has three manufacturing locations in the Portland area and one in Eugene, Ore.  In 2000 sales offices operated in Utah, Washington and California." As reported by Brad Carlson, Idaho Business Review - "Western Electronics to Double Total Space and Manufacturing Capacity, Boise, Idaho, August 2, 2000.  (Ref. 3A)

http://www.westernelectronics.com/press/20000802.html

 

"It was announced June 19, 2002 by Western that Oregon-based Melvina Alexander and Washington-based James Lowrey would join Westerns expanding National Sales Force.   Joe Rarick, existing sales executive for Western Electronics specializing in sheetmetal, machining, plating and custom painting products, will remain in his current responsibilities." (Ref. 3B)

http://www.westernelectronics.com/press/new.htm

 

 "August 2000, Western Electronics employee base was approximately 400, including 125 working in buildings in Garden City, Nampa, and two facilities in Oregon.  Western's company-wide employment is up approximately 150 since new owners took over and made the decision to expand operations significantly, said Var Reeve, president and CEO.  Reeve, a three-year Western Electronics manager, worked on operations and sales sides of the business before being named president.

 

Western was previously owned by Boisean John Wasden, who founded the company in 1978.

 

Reeve said Western's business volume has roughly tripled since the November 2000 ownership change, largely because new owners invested heavily in new and additional equipment so Western could offer more services and in order to pursue larger contracts.

 

The company appears on its way to reaching its $50 million revenue goal for 2000, he said, adding that another goal is to have more than 300 employees at the Meridian building when it becomes fully operational. Western was awarded an approximately $2.5 million contract with a company that designs hardware for high-speed Internet connections, in 2000, Reeve said.  He would not identify this client, for which Western is providing manufacturing services.

 

Western also secured a contract for "significantly more" than $2.5 million to assemble computer projection devices for another client he would not identify. The company's outlook, and desired result, is "to keep landing deals and just keep going up" in employment, Reeve said.  The tight Boise-area labor market (Ada County unemployment: 2.6 percent) makes recruitment a challenge, he noted.

 

Company services include the manufacture and assembly of printed circuit boards, electromechanical assemblies, wire-harnessing equipment, and over-molded cable assemblies uniting computer-related wiring in a molded covering. Other services include a proprietary "vacuum metallization" process for certain types of shielding, painting and power coating, and pad printing.

 

Reeve said his company has been taking a broader approach recently, offering more services and trying to "vertically integrate" so it produces more finished products and "not just parts." Many clients, he noted, "are demanding more turn-key, final, electromechanical assemblies" such as complete power supply units for large pieces of laser equipment.

 

Low and medium-volume runs are Western's niche, Reeve said, noting that Western competes with Kimball Manufacturing, Boise (IBR, 6-5-00) and large-volume contract manufacturer Jabil Circuit, Meridian (IBR, 5-22-00) aired expansion plans in the past month. MCMS in Nampa is another large-volume specialist that has reported major growth."  As reported by Brad Carlson, Idaho Business Review - "Western Electronics to Double Total Space and Manufacturing Capacity, Boise, Idaho, August 2, 2000.  (Ref. 3A)

 

"According to James Lowrey, Western Electronics provides to their customers a fully integrated solution which means Western Electronics can take their customer's printed circuit assemblies, chassis, cable assembly with custom molding, custom harness assemblies with domestic and off shore materials acquisition to accomplish final assembly, test and finished goods distribution to the end customer. 

 

Western provides excellent products and services under a new trademark "eSCM SolutionsTM". Their goal is to provide seamless Supply Chain Management products and services starting with prototype design for manufacturing and testability, material procurement, prototyping, order entry, manufacturing and distribution/fulfillment. With these new products, all aspects of Supply Chain Management (SCM) are brought into focus, including: Customer Relationship Management, Supply Demand Network, Order Processing, Manufacturing and Distribution." (Ref. 3B).

 

"Jabil Circuit began Idaho operations in August, 1998 when the company acquired the assets of Hewlett-Packard's Laser Jet Solutions Group Formatter Manufacturing Organization (FMO).  As part of that deal, Jabil purchased the printed-circuit assembly assets of the FMO operations in Boise, Idaho and Bergamo, Italy for $80 million. Jabil operated on the HP campus in West Boise until it moved its 450 Boise employees to the new plant in Meridian in January.

 

Butch Edwards, Senior Vice President of Operations, said the expansions are in response to significant industry growth and Jabil's own organic growth.  "We are responding to explosive industry growth, expanding to meet current needs as well as readying ourselves for the exponential industry growth we expect in coming years," Edwards said.

 

In June 2000 the St. Petersburg, Florida based Jabil, said it would expand its Meridian manufacturing facility.  It has grown from about $300 million in annual revenues in 1990 to revenues of $2 billion in 1999.

 

Randy Della, senior director of operations said ground breaking for the expansion was scheduled July 2000 and construction would last for six months.  The site in 2000 included about 170,000 square feet of manufacturing and office space on 50-acres.  Della said Jabil would add about 98,000 square feet – about 75,000 square feet of which will be manufacturing space, doubling its manufacturing space and creating additional office areas.  “The company plans to expand to about 300,00 square feet of space within the next two to three years,” Meridian Mayor Robert Corrie said.  A portion of land adjacent to Jabil's Meridian facility in 2000 was being groomed for use by the city as two soccer fields.  This expansion will not affect those areas.

 

Jabil will become the sixth major electronics-manufacturing firm with its own plant in the Treasure Valley.  The expansion could lead to as many as 700 new positions during the next few years, according to Randy Della, Senior Director of Operations.

 

"The continued success and growth of Jabil Circuit is a testament to the commitment and skills of our employees around the globe," Della said. "We are excited that Idaho's contribution to that growth warrants doubling our manufacturing space within six months of moving to our Meridian site."

 

Most of Jabil's worldwide facilities are, or have recently, expanded.  Currently, the company is expanding its California, Michigan, Massachusetts and Florida sites, as well as its sites in Malaysia and Chihuahua, Mexico. Earlier this year, Jabil also announced plans to build a new facility in Hungary and the acquisition of manufacturing capacity in Brazil.

 

"We are responding to explosive industry growth, expanding to meet current needs as well as readying ourselves for the exponential industry growth we expect in coming years," Edwards said.

 

Jabil Circuit, Inc. is an electronic manufacturing service provider for international electronic companies in the communications, computer peripheral, personal computer, automotive and consumer products industries. Jabil offers circuit design, board design from schematic, mechanical design, prototype assembly, volume board assembly, system assembly and direct fulfillment services from 20 automated manufacturing facilities in the North America, Latin American, Europe and Asia."  Information obtained from Jabil Circuit, Inc., Press Release St. Petersburg, Florida, June 15, 2000 (NYSE:JBL) and an article by John Tucker of the Idaho Statesman in July 2000."  (Ref. 4)  http://www.jabil.com/investors/releases/rel06152000.htm

 

In 2000, the city of Meridian commenced plans to build two more fire stations in up coming years, at a cost of about $1.5 million, or about $130 per household. Growth of Meridian residential subdivisions make it necessary to bring Fire Stations closer as about one-fourth of Meridian residents at the close of 2000 were outside the recommended 1.5-mile radius of a fire station."  As reported by Shanahan of the Idaho Statesman.

 

"In meridian, permits for commercial construction issued during the first quarter nearly tripled.  Permits valued at $9.6 million for new Meridian commercial projects were issued during the first three months of 2000, compared to $3.5 million in permits last year.  Much of that is tied to construction of the St. Luke’s Meridian Medical Center.  Work is in progress to add a six-story, 182,600-square-foot wing to the hospital complex.  To the west of the hospital, a Holiday Inn Express hotel and several professional and retail buildings are also under construction."  As reported by John Tucker of the Idaho Statesman.

 

 

CANYON COUNTY COMMERCIAL GROWTH 2000 THROUGH PRESENT  

CHAPTER X - APPENDIX F

 

 

Canyon County Profile http://www.idoc.state.id.us/idcomm/pdfs/Canyon.pdf

 

Nampa Home Page http://www.ci.nampa.id.us

 

Caldwell Home Page http://www.caldwell@ci.caldwell.id.us

 

Idaho City Profile http://www.idoc.state.id.us/idcomm/compro.html

 

Idaho County Profiles - Statistical descriptions of Idaho counties from an economic development perspective http://www.idoc.state.id.us/idcomm/cntypro.html

 

Idaho Data Center http://www.idoc.state.id.us/Data/dtacntr.html

 

Idaho Businesses on the Web

http://www.accessidaho.org/working/bonweb.html

 

Although most geographic regions of the United States economy appear to be growing well, there are some areas that offer unusual opportunities for sustained growth, with factors that indicate a thriving local economy for years to come.  The Boise, Idaho region of the northwest is such an area.  Boise and Nampa are positioned on the leading edge of Idaho’s dramatic growth — growth projected to continue for some time to come.

 

Market conditions are solid and continue a 13-year cycle of sustained growth in the greater Boise area.  Southwestern Idaho has a population base of about 300,900, "growing at a rate substantially higher than the national average. Growing at an annual rate of 1.7%, the Census Bureau (in its 2000 census) ranked Idaho the third-fastest growing state this decade for the percentage of population and housing growth, and the Boise-Nampa urban area was ranked the fifth-fastest growing cities this decade.  Since the last official head count on April 1, 1990, Idaho’s population has grown by nearly a quarter of a million people, more than 24 percent.  Only Arizona, at just more than 30 percent, and Nevada, at more than 50 percent, has seen greater growth."

 

"The Census Bureau estimated that in July 2001 Idaho's population was 1,321,006 residents. That was an increase of about 27,053 (2.1%) from the 2000 Census. Of that increase, the Census Bureau estimated that about 3,700 (13.7%) was due to net international migration (immigrant settlement). During the same period there was a net domestic migration increase of about 10,400 from an influx of native-born residents."

Employment growth is surging in the Boise Metropolitian Statistical Area (MSA) due to renewed growth in many of the state’s high-tech markets.  Even though agriculture is in a slump 2002, in 2000 non-ag employment growth in the state was expected to slow to 2.2 to 2.6 percent pace in 2001 and 2002.  For the twelve months period ending August 2000, non-ag employment in the Boise MSA increased by close to 4.6 percent, creating 9,600 new jobs compared to the prior twelve-month period.  While this is not the 6.7 percent pace of non-ag employment growth that the Boise MSA experienced in 1993 and 1994, it remains over twice the national rate and one of the fastest growing MSA’s in the U.S.  (John Church, Principal, Idaho Economics, at the Boise Metro Chamber’s Economic Outlook Forum 2000).

 

July 2000 the Gross Domestic Product (GDP) estimation for the next 5 years was 3.2% annually (Idaho Statesman 6/00).

 

"The state could receive more than $2 million a year for land it leases to alternative energy companies. A federal study has concluded that Idaho owns 39,500 acres of land with winds that blow hard enough to warrant wind farms. The study says state-owned lands have the potential to produce 660 megawatts, enough juice to power 148,000 homes.

 

Operating Facilities by Renewable Energy Technology in the State of Idaho.

 

http://www.eren.doe.gov/state_energy/opfacbytech.cfm?state=ID This table provides data of all currently tracked renewable energy facilities in the state.  Data is derived from the Renewable Plant Information System, developed at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory Renewable Electric Plant Information System. http://www.eren.doe.gov/repis

 

"Another $500,000 is going to rural areas to hire regional economic development specialists, who will work with employers interested in moving to their areas."

 

"Growth in Idaho's economy is strong even though agriculture is in a slump.  Cheap hydroelectric power rates are among the lowest in the nation. The relaxed quality of life has attracted national recognition."

 

"Signals are prominent that the family farm in Idaho has shifted to survival mode and that “some producers will be forced to leave production this year,” said Neil Meyer, University of Idaho extension economist who traveled the state last fall for meetings on “Coping with the Current Ag Economy.”

"Factors threatening the farm lifestyle are production at record levels worldwide, declining demand mostly caused by Asian economic problems, excess reserves that drive commodity prices below production costs, and continuing effects of the 1996 Freedom to Farm Act that reduces “market transition payments” over seven years until gone in the year 2003," Neil Meyer, University of Idaho extension. Economist.

"Idaho farmers got more than $262 million in direct government payments last year. The federal government spent more than $600 million on all farm programs during 2001, including the direct payments, research, loans and other programs."

 

"Manufacturing has recently supplanted agriculture as the most important sector of Idaho's economy. Cattle and dairy goods are among the leading agricultural products. Idaho's chief crops are potatoes (for which the state, easily the nation's largest producer, is famous), hay, wheat, peas, beans, and sugar beets. Electronic and computer equipment, processed foods, lumber, and chemicals are the major manufactured items."

 

This geographic reality is evidence by the large number of fortune 500 companies having headquarters or major prescience in Boise!  The area is perfectly suited for new business growth and is attracting new businesses at a rapid rate.

 

"The May 29, 2000 issue of Forbes magazine announced that Idaho ranks fifth on Forbes list of best places in the United States to do business and advance a career."

 

In the year 2000, Idaho was ranked sixth fastest growing state in the U.S. (John Church, Principal, Idaho Economics, at the Boise Metro Chamber’s Economic Outlook Forum 2000).

 

“You can’t transport this quality of life easily,” said Ed Zimmer, chief executive officer at Electronic Controls Co., a Boise firm employing 150. “The major factor behind our growth is the quality of the talent we’ve been able to attract and retain.”

 

“Development in Canyon County is moving east, and Meridian is moving west,” said Patrick Laney." As reported by John Tucker of the Idaho Statesman October 6, 1999.

 

"Shopping in the growing Canyon County continues to get better with a $10 million renovation at Nampa's Karcher Mall, 1509 Caldwell Blvd. The remodeling includes newly redone storefront facades, new flooring and a food court that will bring new stores into the area.   Adjacent to the mall area you'll find new restaurants such as the family favorite Red Robin and a 14-screen Edwards theater megaplex on the west side of the mall. Popular stores at the mall include KB Toy Store, Helen's Gifts & Flowers, Emporium and The Bon Marche."      (Ref. 5) http://cityguide.entertainmentidaho.com/fe/Shopping/main.asp 

 

Retail vacancy rates in Canyon County remained low in late 2000, at 3.7 percent."  As reported by Commercial Report, Knipe & Knipe.

 

Commercial permits for the first three months of 2000, totaled $3.6 million compared to $8.1 million during the same period a year ago."  As reported by John Tucker of the Idaho Statesman October 10, 1999.

 

"Canyon County projects include the Canyon Park at the Idaho Center, covering 16.5-acres between Franklin Road and the Idaho Center.  Construction of the first two-story, 33,000-square-foot office building was scheduled to start in March 2000 with completion expected mid-2000.  Projected plans consist of four office buildings with 100,000 square feet of space.  Developers having purchased a majority ownership in Sweetwater Holdings LLC (SWH) acquired approval and made agreements between the city of Nampa and SWH.  SWH parent company, Northwest Parks LLC and Nampa had an agreement launched in 1996 – which included construction of a farmers’ market, a movie studio, a hotel and retail shops, which was never realized.  SLB has inked a deal with Premier Alliance, a financial planning services company from down town Nampa, to occupy half of the first building.

 

Other commercial de­velopment has occurred along Nampa-Cald­well Boulevard, the main link between the “twin cities" of Nampa and Caldwell, and along 12th Avenue Road."  As reported by the staff of The Idaho Statesman September 24, 2000.

 

Work commenced in1999 to extend Birch Lane Northwest of the Idaho Center to connect if from Can-Ada Road to Franklin Boulevard. The Franklin Boulevard area, near MCMS Inc., and Micron Electronics, is one of the fastest-growing residential areas in Nampa. Garrity Boulevard exit is a main access to the interstate."   As reported by John Tucker of the Idaho Statesman October 6, 1999. 

 

“MCMS Inc., which manufactures printed circuit-boar assemblies, employs about 1,464 people in its Nampa plant.  It foresees its total employment growing to 1,680 by the end of 2000 based on current market conditions.  Other major players in the local economy include:  Hewlett-Packard Co.; forest-products company Boise Cascade Corp.; agribusiness giant J. R. Simplot Co.; computer manufacture Micron Electronics Inc.; and mobile information management technology provider Extended Systems Inc." As reported by the staff of The Idaho Statesman September 24, 2000.

 

“The Idaho Legislature has earmarked $2 million for Boise State University’s (BSU) Canyon County complex,” spokesman Larry Burke said."   As reported by John Tucker October 9, 1999. 

 

"BSU received $3.5 million from the Legislature during 2000 for the 150-acre campus in Nampa.  Construction began in the spring of 2000 on a $2.6 million student recreation center that will offer state-of-the-art exercise equipment, a climbing wall and fitness classes.  A 642-space parking garage opened in time for the first day of school in the fall of 2000.  The university, founded in 1932 as a junior college, didn’t become a state university until 1974.

 

Northwest Nazarene University in Nampa is continuing to grow and add new programs.  When it changed its name from Northwest Nazarene College to Northwest Nazarene University (NNU) in 1999, the Christian Liberal arts institution restructured and divided into four schools led by deans.  The university has a full-time enrollment of more than 1,300 students.  The essential mission of NNU, which was founded in 1913, is to develop Christian character within the philosophy and frame work of genuine scholarship.” Jennifer Gallagher Oxley of the Idaho Statesman September 24, 2000.

 

“Nampa commercial expansion includes Nampa’s Karcher Mall, 1509 Caldwell Blvd.  The remolding includes newly redone storefront facades that will bring new stores into the area.  The project is estimated at $10 million dollars.  Adjacent to the mall you’ll find new restaurants such as the family favorite Red Robin and a 14-creen Edwards theater complex on the west side of the mall.  Popular stores at the mall include KB Toy Store, Helen’s Gifts & Flowers, Emporium Styling Salon and The Bon Marche."  As reported by Dana Oland of the Idaho Statesman September 24, 2000.

 

Hedrick refocuses, negotiates as public projects dwindle - Storage units provide latest work niche - Idaho Business Review (Ref. 6)

"Scott Hedrick Construction Inc. located in Boise, is actively involved in Idaho's commercial growth. The Boise-based general contractor has several large public works projects to its credit as well.

Canyon County and McCall projects include:

 

Scott Hedrick Construction Inc. is finishing the new Kuna High School, valued at $12.3 million, to be completed August.  The two-story, 170,000 square-foot high school, situated on 50 acres, includes complete site work such as baseball, football and soccer fields, tennis courts and other amenities.

"We built that project in about 14 months," Hedrick said.

 The firm recently completed the Canyon County Humane Shelter.


Hedrick was the successful bidder for Mercy’s emergency shelter in Nampa, Pridmore said. The $1 million, 9,000 square-foot facility was completed earlier this year.

Hedrick also built a 4,600-square-foot custom home in Kings Pines estates in McCall for Avest. In all, Hedrick has done about $7 million in work for Avest LP, Weber said. Additional storage sites covering hundreds of thousands of square feet are planned, said Weber.

Hedrick also does some high-end residential construction, including a 6,000-square-foot home for Albertson’s CEO Larry Johnston and another 6,000-square-foot home for Rick Belluzzo, president of Microsoft, he said.

 

Among his more unique private-sector projects, Hedrick is working on the McCall Ice Rink and Event Center. The $5.4 million project, funded by the Rich Sabala Foundation, is a 20,000 square-foot building with an 85-foot by 200-foot ice surface. The center includes bleachers and concessions.

"We were involved with that from the day it was conceived," said Hedrick. "We were negotiated in as construction manager and general contractor on that project."

Also in McCall, Hedrick is building an 85-room, $5.7 million Holiday Inn motel and convention center in McCall for Bob Hunt.

 

Hedrick got his background and experience while working with his father, Win, as partners, beginning in 1979. By 1982, Scott had launched his own firm.
"All my experience comes from working with my dad," he said. "He had the real estate company (Hedrick & Bodine Realty), he developed a lot of subdivisions and did some commercial construction."

When father and son partnered, Scott said his goal was to do more commercial work, especially public-works projects.

The firm did about $28 million in sales in 2001, he said, and "it would appear we’ll be pretty close to that again this year."

The firm employs about 45, including four project managers and 10 field superintendents, with the balance comprised of carpenters and other professional construction personnel."  As reported by Ken Levy, Special to the IBR.  Information obtained from an article Published June 17, 2002 in Idaho Construction Review and is not the full report.  (Ref. 6)
http://www.idahobusiness.net

 CANYON COUNTY CONFLICTS OVER GROWTH 2000 THROUGH PRESENT

CHAPTER X - APPENDIX G

 

 

Craig Quintana of the Idaho Statesman clearly reports on Canyon County tensions over county growth and struggle to balance planning and property rights dated in his article posted August 8, 2000: 

 

“After three decades, Oscar Wick is finished farming and now wants his 60 acres southeast of Caldwell to produce homes arid cash instead of crops.

 

John Chapman farms his land next to Wick's property and wants to continue as he has for the past 30 years - unfettered by residential neighbors who may find the smells arid sounds of agriculture a nuisance.

 

Their dispute, which is in court, is a small skirmish in a larger political and philosophical battle tearing at Canyon County.

 

The Canyon County Commission in January approved Wick's proposal to subdivide his land acknowledging the owner's right to do as he wishes with his property.

 

The decision reversed a ruling by the Canyon County Planning and Zoning Commission, and prompted Chapman to ask a judge to step in to keep the County from violating its own growth blueprint and planning principles.

 

Disputes over growth --how much, where and under which circumstances – led Canyon County commissioners in August 2000 to fire the majority of its Planning Commission.

 

Four of the seven members -- Norm Alder, Carolyn Harrold, Torn Dorsey and Clinton Pline - were dismissed Aug. 4 after refusing to approve a final development plat. Planning Commissioners Roger Wright, Ed Falkenstein and Jack Atkeson remain. Planning commissioners serve as advisers to and are appointed by the County Commission.

 

The ousters ended an increasingly rocky relationship between the Planning Commission and the County Commission. Wick's was among 24 of 28 development cases appealed within the past 18 months in which the County Commission overruled the planners. Two other appeals are pending, according to County officials. Only four of the Planning Commission's denials were upheld by the County Commission.

 

Upset by six of the reversals, Chapman and five other property owners or groups have gone to court.

 

 

Those who back the county’s position say the elected officials are properly looking out for individuals like Wick, whose rights are guaranteed by County and state law.

 

Critics say the County Commission is encouraging suburban sprawl, a kind of low-density development that is hard to serve with schools and roads and which consumes valuable agricultural land. Protection of farmland from sprawl also is guaranteed by County and state law, they argue.

 

The situation represents a clash of values in a County that's becoming increasingly less rural and borders the state's largest urban center, Ada County.

 

“Welcome to growing pains,” said David Eberle, president of the Land Trust of the Treasure Valley. “They're a county in conflict.”

 

In years past, Eberle's land-preservation group has held informal discussions with some County officials about strategies for retaining farmland, but the talks never have amounted to any specific proposal.

 

Many expect the dispute over the direction of development in the county to be a factor in November 2000 when County Commissioner Pat Galvin will be up for re-election. Galvin voted with County Commissioner Man Beebe to remove the planning commissioners.  County Commission Chairman Todd Lakey was not present for the vote but later said he approved of the decision.

 

“It's a classic fight, and one that the voters will have to figure out,” Eberle said. “This is what growth is all about. These are tough decisions that a community has to make.”

 

Tensions over growth have escalated in recent years as more cropland is taken out of production and more homes go up.

 

While 84 percent Canyon County remains in agricultural use today, the number of acres in farms, the number of farmers and the number of farm workers have declined steadily in recent years, according to Idaho Department of Commerce statistics.

 

Those declines stand in contrast to big gains in the number of people working in construction and manufacturing over the past 20 years.

 

The philosophical differences between the Planning Commission, which was dominated by a farm-friendly majority until the dismissals, and the County Commission have been laid bare over the past year and a half.

 

Planning commissioners repeatedly rejected proposals to cut farmland into smaller pieces for development - mostly to be overruled by the County Commission on appeal. The elected officials dismissed the planners' objections in 12 of 13 cases last year and in 12 of 15 cases decided this year.

 

Both sides cite the Canyon County Comprehensive Plan, the county’s growth blueprint, and the Idaho Local Planning Act as justification.

 

Agriculture preservationists say the Canyon County Commission is not following its own laws or those of the state by approving “leapfrog” developments, like Wick’s that are disconnected from established urban areas.

 

The county’s growth plan and state law say that development should be concentrated in cities and their “areas of impact,” or future expansion zones required by state law, said Ten Ottens, secretary of the Canyon County Farm Bureau, who also is a planner.

 

“Look what happened in Ada County” Ottens said, “We agree there should be growth, but it should be inside the cities and in the areas of impact.”

 

 When development gets a foothold in ag land, new residents who want a sanitized country atmosphere doom neighboring farms, she said.

 

“There’re near cows, but they don't want the smell,” Ottens said. They don't want the aerial sprayer coming over at 6 a.m. on a Sunday morning.

 

County commissioners and their supporters say they are tying to protect individual’s right to do what they want with their land, a core Idaho value. It's difficult to reconcile that right with the strong desire to preserve the county’s agricultural heritage, Beebe said.

 

“Like it or not, growth is inevitable, Beebe said.”  As always, the goal of the County is to protect the prime agricultural land whenever possible.

 

In recent years, the county’s attempt to forge a middle ground has taken shape in the “ag harmony” proposal. The concept was to allow development of marginal farm ground, while keeping the best soil in production through a complex set of land-use policies.

 

But the committee working on the proposal eventually was fragmented by the ag-vs. - development split, and the proposal was shelved earlier this year when it came before the Planning and Zoning Commission.

 

The lack of ag harmony guidelines has left the Planning Commission and County Commission to sort out the issues on a largely case-by-case basis.  Mostly, they have disagreed.  In evaluating the disputed developments, planning commissioners generally have objected to a lack of adequate roads, schools, and police and fire services or the folly or building homes in the middle of farms.

Several parts of the Canyon County Comprehensive Plan require the county to keep development close to cities, to locate homes where they are easiest to serve and to save the best farmland from development.

 

The philosophy the Planning Commission used to evaluate, and ultimately reject, the developments was spelled out in the county’s original growth plan, written in 1975 and updated 20 years later, said Norm Alder, a Melba farmer and one of the four ousted planning commissioners.  “In 1975, they set the ground rules, and now everyone wants to change them,” he said.  “It's sad, I guess.  It'd be so easy if they'd follow the comp plan.”

 

The issue is more than philosophical for Alder and his wife, Kathy. They've joined others in asking a judge to review the county’s approval of a subdivision near their south Canyon County farm.

 

“By the time everybody gets their subdivisions done we’ll be squeezed out,” said Kathy Alder, a member of Idaho Agri-Women, an advocacy group. “They see property rights as the right of the person who wants to subdivide.  That's not considering the property rights of the person down the street."

 

The Alders say growth needs to occur near the cities, which have expansion zones expected to accept development.  “We weren't trying to be ugly,” she said.  “We weren’t trying to stop growth.  We want it to he managed.  Instead of the normal spread from the cities out, they're putting it out in the county.”

 

It's a philosophical as well as an emotional issue for the Alders.  Several years ago, they were offered $10,000 an acre for some of their land near Melba.  They rejected the offer, despite the potential for big profit.  “I’m just a dumb farmer, I guess,” Norm Alder said.  “Personally, I don't see that as a wise thing to do for society.”  Their view is diametrically opposed to that of county officials and their supporters, who view the former Planning Commission majority as militantly pro-ag and anti-growth.

 

As long as they own the land, they can make all the anti-growth decisions they want, said Galvin, the county commissioner most critical of the ousted planning commissioners.

 

But people who no longer want to farm should not be forced into it, said Galvin, a staunch supporter of private-property rights.  “I think that's taking away from some people's rights,” she said.  “A lot of the people who are complaining about subdividing are not considering private-property rights.  And that's exactly what the Planning Commission was doing, Galvin said.

 

Many of the cases feeding the friction between the County Commission and the Planning Commission involved attorney Susan Wildwood, a Boise attorney who represents Wick and many others.

 

Wildwood said she is sensitive not to take cases unless there is a compelling reason to pull the land out of production, such as encroaching development or financial hardship. That accounts for her success before the County Commission, not the Planning Commission, she said.

 

“The cases that I've been involved with have consistently been overturned” by the County Commission, she said.  Fear of losing ag land amid the ongoing population boom motivated the planning commissioners to take unreasonable stances, she said.

 

On the Wick case, Wildwood said, they denied her client the right to have 38 homes on his 60 acres when pre-existing zoning approvals would have allowed him to have 19 residential lots.  If the land was going to be convened from ag land to residential in any event, it made no sense to subdivide for such a low number of homes, Wildwood said.

 

While the county's growth plan and the state planning act encourage farmland protection and the concentration of development around urban areas, they clearly indicate property rights come first, Wildwood said. 

 

Under the terms of the Local Land Use Planning Act, protection of private-property rights is listed alongside protection of prime agricultural land and encouragement of urban development around cities.

 

The law is a general statement, meant to allow local officials to sort out which value comes first, said Jim Weatherby, a Boise State University professor of public policy and administration.

 

“As originally drafted the local planning act respected the right of local authorities to make many of these decisions,” Weatherby said.

 

“This is one of the major philosophical conflicts between the right of individuals to develop their own property and the community interest in maintaining compact development and avoiding sprawl.”

 

Ultimately, the courts often are called upon to decide who's right, Weatherby said.  Despite the development ideals of planners and the comprehensive plan, the fact is many people want to live in the country, Wildwood said.  “They don't want to be in a city; they want to have horses,” she said.

 

Some planning advocates and other local officials agree with much of what critics such as the Alders say.  The county government appears to be putting property rights above good planning and efficient government, said Jon Barrett, a coordinator with Idaho Smart Growth, a planning advocacy group.

 

“The property rights appear to be defined differently there,” he said, “It's more like, I can do anything.”  Canyon’s continuing struggle to provide adequate schools, roads, sewers and emergency services makes the far-flung development costly, Barrett said.  Soon, County and regional governments such as road and school districts will be far behind, he predicted.

 

That may already be happening to some extent in the Vallivue School District, whose 1,679 student-enrollment puts it beyond capacity.  In response to recent subdivisions, the district has informed the county that it can’t handle additional students.

 

The district is preparing a $10.35 million bond issue proposal for a Sept. 7, 2000 special election to build a new elementary school and remodel the east and west Canyon elementaries.

 

“We're over capacity in every one of those schools,” said Vaughn Heinrich, School District superintendent.  “We've got to be able to handle the growth,” he said.  If they develop too many (homes) at one time, it really has a negative impact.  But Heinrich also is sympathetic to farmers who want to develop their land because of changing economics, and the county officials who must consider their requests.  “It does affect us, but, on the other hand, there is a choice, and it is private ownership," he said. 

 

Melba Mayor Hal Forsgren is interested in development that could be occurring nearer his town and supporting his tax-base. “Why go to the trouble to have impact areas when they let developers develop out in the middle of nowhere?”  He asked.  His town, with about 200 residents, is contemplating a $100,000 upgrade to its wastewater treatment plant and may establish a special tax district to fix its streets.

 

Many of the anti-growth arguments make sense to Wick, who maintains a soft spot for agriculture despite his attempt to develop his 60 acres.  Wick has farmed his land since 1970, growing sugar beets, wheat and other crops.  At 59 he is moving into retirement and his development is supposed to supply his nest egg.  A farmer a heart, he said his head says he must take advantage of his opportunity.  “You can't raise corn at the same price as you can raise houses,” he said.  Wick said he has taken a number of steps to make his development farm-friendly, including extra-wide setbacks to allow nearby field spraying.  But it's not enough for Chapman, who fears the beginning of residential building will signal the end of his farming days.

 

When residential development moves into ag country, a chain reaction is set off, said William Morrow, Chapman's attorney.  Homeowners will begin to complain about the smells and sounds from the farms, and the area's property values increase, providing further incentive for the farmers to move on, he said.

 

“If Wick gets his subdivision, he'll change the character of that property,” Morrow said. “Probably, the surrounding landowners will do similar things, and my guy, who's a fanner, will have to find other land to farm.”

 

From atop a hill north of Melba, the view is of farms covering the countryside to the west.  Canyon County planners and agriculture interests are split on how best to preserve the county’s farmland and how to balance the interests of property owners who want to use their land in different ways.

 

Norm and Kathy Alder intend to hold on to their 900-acre farm near Melba and grow seed corn, alfalfa, potatoes and other crops on 900 acres near Melba." Craig Quintana of the Idaho Statesman, August 8, 2000:

 

 

LAND DEVELOPMENT SPECIALIST AND HOMEBUILDERS OF IDAHO

CHAPTER X - APPENDIX H

 

 

Builder Directory http://www.builderdirectory.com

 

BUILDERS Who Build with Rumford Fireplaces

http://www.rumford.com/builder.html

 

Home Remodeling Companies in Idaho: Contractors for Kitchen, Bathroom, Roofing, Siding, Fence, Deck, Patio, Landscaping, Sunroom, Basement http://www.us-home-remodeling.com/idaho

 

Idaho General Contractors Pacific Northwest Directory

http://www.nwbuildnet.com/nwbn/id_con.html

 

Idaho Home Builders - American Builders Network, Inc. http://www.americanbuilders.com/ID

 

Idaho DOE Status of State Energy Codes http://www.energycodes.gov/implement/state_codes/state_status.cfm?state_AB=ID

 

Idaho Rock Creek (RCWP 3) http://h2osparc.wq.ncsu.edu/info/rcwp/idprof.html

 

Idaho State University Building Construction Technology Student Chapter

http://www.idahohomebuilders.com/ISU%20Chapter.htm

 

Land-Grant University Contacts http://www.reeusda.gov/f4hn/fdrm/statcon.htm 

 

Ormond Builders, Inc. - "Is one of the largest building contractors in the Intermountain West.  Specializing in the construction of commercial, public, industrial, and specialized buildings, we have a long list of successful projects.  We are proud of the relationships that we have built with our clients and feel that their recommendations are the best measure of our success." http://www.ormondbuilders.com

 

O'Neill Enterprises, Inc. - McCall, Boise, Sun Valley, Idaho

http://www.newhomeweb.com/Communities/States/communities_id.htm

 

North Idaho Building Contractors Association, Inc. http://www.nibca.com

 

CSHQA architectual and Engineering Firm located in Boise, Sacramento, Los Angels and Portland http://www.cshqa.com

 

Resources for Earth System Science Education

http://www.usra.edu/esse/ford/ESS205/g300www/g300wwwbios.html

 

Rosewood Builders, Inc., P.O. Box 51535, Idaho Falls, ID 83405 US
http://www.rosewooddevelopment.com/commercial.html

 

Skyline Corporation - "Was founded in Boise, Idaho in 1967 as a land development company.  It has become the largest residential Development Company in Idaho, having developed over 3,900 home sites in Idaho.  President EDWARD A. JOHNSON and his sons are actively involed in Ada County Land Development.  Address:  5330 Farrow Street, Boise, Idaho 83704.  Business. No. 208-377-4104. 

 

State of Idaho Board of Professional Engineers and Professional Land Surveyors http://www.state.id.us/ipels

 

Stewart Construction, C'oeur d'Alene, ID - Idaho Home Builders Listing http://www.homebuilders.com/states/id/id.htm

 

Teton Valley Builders Association

http://www.tetonvalleybuilders.com/members.html

 

Toothman-Orton Engineering Company, Boise Idaho

http://www.toengrco.com/site_map.html

 

Tomlinson Black North Idaho
http://www.tb.com/Neighborhoods/main.asp?NeighborhoodID=13

 

EQNEEDF views on Politics, Environment, Energy, Health, National, and Foreign Affairs

                ENERGY QUEST, former National Energy Efficient Development Inc.

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