This report allows for home value evaluation from 1998 to 2005 and was not part of the Montebello Book.

 

ADA AND CANYON COUNTY RESIDENTIAL AND COMMERCIAL GROWTH AND

RESIDENTIAL HOME SALES/PRICES FROM 1998 to April 2005

CHAPTER X Appendix B to E

 

CANYON COUNTY RESIDENTIAL HOME SALES/PRICES     

1998 THROUGH March 2005

CHAPTER X - APPENDIX B

 

Canyon County - "Was Established March 7, 1891 with its county seat at Caldwell. Current sources attribute the name to the canyon of the Boise River near Caldwell. However, both John Rees and Vardis Fisher believed it was named for the Snake River canyon, which forms a natural boundary for the county. The Hudson's Bay Company established Fort Boise in 1834 near what is now Parma, but abandoned it in 1855. Immigrants traveled through Canyon County on the Oregon Trail."

http://www.accessidaho.org/aboutidaho/county/canyon.html

 

Preservation of the past, conservation of natural resources and traditional values maintained from generation to generation, makes the residents of Idaho well positioned for the world tomorrow.

 

Idaho Commerce & Labor http://www.idoc.state.id.us

 

“The Intermountain Multiple Listing Services, Inc (IMLS) http://www.intermountainmls.com is a subsidiary corporation of the Ada County Association of Realtors® http://www.adacounty-realtors.com and produces a multiple listing service for use by its Realtor members. The IMLS is subject to the Bylaws, Rules and Regulations of IMLS, subject to the approval of the Ada County Association of Realtors and is operated under the Multiple Listing Service Committee.

 

The Intermountain Multiple Listing Service was sought by the members who wanted to do business with other Realtors who agreed to abide by the Realtors Code of Ethics and high standards of professionalism.

 

The purpose of the IMLS is to make possible the orderly dissemination and correlation of listing information to its members so that Realtors may better serve the buying and selling public.

 

"These statistics are based upon information secured by agents from the property owner or their representative. The accuracy of this information, while deemed reliable, has not been verified and is NOT guaranteed. These statistics are not intended to represent the total number of properties sold in these counties during the respective time periods.  The Southwestern Idaho Regional Multiple Listing Service provides these statistics for purposes of general market analysis, but makes no representations as to the past or future appreciation or depreciation of property values."

 

Canyon County Residential Home Sales statistics provided by Intermountain Multiple Listing Services, Inc (IMLS)

http://www.intermountainmls.com/rstats/CanInterface.html

 

New home construction within the present Boise City limits is proceeding rapidly but is limited by cost for new development, and scarce available ground for residential subdivisions. There are strong demand indications of future growth of Boise and the southwestern region of Boise is an area capable of handling population growth.

 

First Quarter 1998 Statistics not available on Southwestern Idaho Regional Multiple Listing Service Home Sales Statistics Web site as of June 20, 2002” (Ref. 1A).

 

During the Second Quarter of 1998 Single-Family Homes Sold in Canyon County Totaled 891.  The average Home price was $95,475, with the Median Home price at $85,000.  New Home Construction totaled 376, with an average Home price of $85,650 and the Median Home price at $85,650.  Existing Homes sold totaled 515 with an average Home price of $94,558 and the Median Home price at $84,000” (Ref. 1B). http://www.intermountainmls.com/rstats/canyon2q.html 

 

During the Third Quarter of 1998 Single-Family Homes Sold in Canyon County Totaled 1,496.  The average Home price was $96,543, with the Median Home price at $86,011.  New Home Construction totaled 653, with an average Home price of $97,268 and the Median Home price at $87,990.  Existing Homes sold totaled 843 with an average Home price of $96,668 and the Median Home price at $86,000” (Ref. 1C).  http://www.intermountainmls.com/rstats/canyon3q.html 

 

During the Fourth Quarter of 1998 Single-Family Homes Sold in Canyon County Totaled 1,957.  The average Home price was $96,340, with the Median Home price at $85,900.  New Home Construction totaled 957, with an average Home price of $94,150 and the Median Home price at $85,232.  Existing Homes sold totaled 1,000 with an average Home price of $98,443 and the Median Home price at $87,500” (Ref. 1D). http://www.intermountainmls.com/rstats/CanQtr4.htm 

 

Second through Fourth quarter 1998 total # Single-Family Homes Sold in Canyon County:

 

QUARTER/YEAR

NEW CONST

EXISTING HOMES

TOTAL LISTING

1st/1998

Not Reported

Not Reported

Not Reported

2nd/1998

376

515

891

3rd/1998

653

843

1,496

4th/1998

957

1,000

1,957

TOTAL

1,986

2,358

4,344

 

Canyon County total for Second through Fourth quarter 1998 Monthly Average total # Single-Family Homes Sold by decimal:

 

Ada County

NEW CONST

EXISTING HOMES

TOTAL LISTING

April to Dec 1998

220.66

262

482.66

 

1999

 

During the First Quarter of 1999 Single-Family Homes Sold in Canyon County Totaled 411.  The average Home price was $97,216, with the Median Home price at $88,000.  New Home Construction totaled 205, with an average Home price of $96,478 and the Median Home price at $89,550.  Existing Homes sold totaled 206 with an average Home price of $99,234 and the Median Home price at $84,500” (Ref. 2A). http://www.intermountainmls.com/rstats/Can1Q99.htm 

 

During the Second Quarter of 1999 Single-Family Homes Sold in Canyon County Totaled 1,078.  The average Home price was $96,657, with the Median Home price at $87,045.  New Home Construction totaled 518, with an average Home price of $95,333 and the Median Home price at $87,782.  Existing Homes sold totaled 560 with an average Home price of $97,882 and the Median Home price at $86,100” (Ref. 2B). http://www.intermountainmls.com/rstats/Can2Q99.htm 

 

During the Third Quarter of 1999 Single-Family Homes Sold in Canyon County Totaled 1,737.  The average Home price was $96,903, with the Median Home price at $87,370.  New Home Construction totaled 833, with an average Home price of $95,938 and the Median Home price at $87,825.  Existing Homes sold totaled 904 with an average Home price of $97,792 and the Median Home price at $86,000” (Ref. 2C). http://www.intermountainmls.com/rstats/Can3Q99.htm 

 

During the Fourth Quarter of 1999 Single-Family Homes Sold in Canyon County Totaled 2,272.  The average Home price was $96,197, with the Median Home price at $87,385.  New Home Construction totaled 1,082, with an average Home price of $96,205 and the Median Home price at $88,000.  Existing Homes sold totaled 1,190 with an average Home price of $96,191 and the Median Home price at $85,700” (Ref. 2D). http://www.intermountainmls.com/rstats/Can4Q99.htm 

 

First through Fourth quarter 1999 total # Single-Family Homes Sold in Canyon County:

 

QUARTER/YEAR

NEW CONST

EXISTING HOMES

TOTAL LISTING

1st/1999

205

206

411

2nd/1999

518

560

1,078

3rd/1999

833

904

1,737

4th/1999

1,082

1,190

2,272

TOTAL

2,638

2,860

5,638

 

First through Fourth quarter 1999 Monthly Average total # Single-Family Homes Sold in Canyon County by decimal:

 

Canyon County

NEW CONST

EXISTING HOMES

TOTAL LISTING

1999

219.83

238.33

469.83

 

April 1998 to December 1999 total # Single-Family Homes Sold in Canyon County:

 

Canyon County

NEW CONST

EXISTING HOMES

TOTAL LISTING

April to Dec 1998

1,986

2,358

4,344

1999

2,638

2,860

5,498

TOTAL

4,624

5,218

9, 842

 

April 1998 to December 1999 Monthly Average total # Single-Family Homes Sold in Canyon County by decimal:

 

Canyon County

NEW CONST

EXISTING HOMES

TOTAL LISTING

April 1998 to Dec 1999

220.19

248.47

468.66

 

2000

 

During the First Quarter of 2000 Single-Family Homes Sold in Canyon County Totaled 452.  The average Home price was $93,121, with the Median Home price at $86,860.  New Home Construction totaled 208, with an average Home price of $97,440 and the Median Home price at $89,317.  Existing Homes sold totaled 244 with an average Home price of $89,439 and the Median Home price at $82,700” (Ref. 3A. http://www.intermountainmls.com/rstats/Can1Q00.htm 

 

During the Second Quarter of 2000 Single-Family Homes Sold in Canyon County Totaled 672.  The average Home price was $101,581, with the Median Home price at $91,000.  New Home Construction totaled 266, with an average Home price of $106,959 and the Median Home price at $94,557.  Existing Homes sold totaled 406 with an average Home price of $98,058 and the Median Home price at $87,000” (Ref. 3B). http://www.intermountainmls.com/rstats/Can2Q.htm 

 

During the Third Quarter of 2000 Single-Family Homes Sold in Canyon County Totaled 658.  The average Home price was $101,581, with the Median Home price at $91,000.  New Home Construction totaled 243, with an average Home price of $106,959 and the Median Home price at $94,557.  Existing Homes sold totaled 415 with an average Home price of $98,058 and the Median Home price at $87,000” (Ref. 3C). http://www.intermountainmls.com/rstats/Canyon3Q.htm 

 

During the Fourth Quarter of 2000 Single-Family Homes Sold in Canyon County Totaled 564.  The average Home price was $101,020, with the Median Home price at $93,000.  New Home Construction totaled 247, with an average Home price of $106,959 and the Median Home price at $94,557.  Existing Homes sold totaled 317 with an average Home price of $98,058 and the Median Home price at $87,000” (Ref. 3D). http://www.intermountainmls.com/rstats/can4q00.html 

 

First through Fourth quarters of 2000 total # Single-Family Homes Sold in Canyon County:

 

QUARTER/YEAR

NEW CONST

EXISTING HOMES

TOTAL LISTING

1st/2000

208

244

452

2nd/2000

266

406

672

3rd/2000

243

415

658

4th/2000

247

317

564

TOTAL

964

1,382

2,346

 

First through Fourth quarter 2000 Monthly Average total # Single-Family Homes Sold in Canyon County by decimal:

 

Canyon County

NEW CONST

EXISTING HOMES

TOTAL LISTING

2000

80.33

115.66

195.5

 

April 1998 to December 2000 total # Single-Family Homes Sold in Canyon County:

 

Canyon County

NEW CONST

EXISTING HOMES

TOTAL LISTING

April to Dec 1998

1,986

2,358

4,344

1999

2,638

2,860

5,498

2000

964

1,382

2,346

TOTAL

5,588

6,600

12,188

 

April 1998 to December 2000 Monthly Average total # Single-Family Homes Sold in Canyon County by decimal:

 

Canyon County

NEW CONST

EXISTING HOMES

TOTAL LISTING

April 1998 to 2000

169.33

200

369.33

 

Most of the new-home construction in 2000 was in West Nampa and West Caldwell al­though new starter homes are also springing up in Nampa north of Interstate 84 near one of the area's major employers, Micron Electron­ics Inc.  The small towns of Star in North Ada Coun­ty and Middleton in North Canyon County are also seeing a lot of home-building activity."  As reported by John Tucker of the Idaho Statesman September 24, 2000.

 

Canyon County, Idaho - U.S. Census Bureau: State and County QuickFacts

http://quickfacts.census.gov/qfd/states/16/16027.html

 

Housing units

2000

47,965

Households

2000

45,018

Home ownership rate

2000

73.3%

Population estimate

2001

139,821

 

Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2000 Data Set: Census 2000 Summary File 1 (SF 1) 100-Percent Data - Geographic Area: Idaho -- County

http://factfinder.census.gov/servlet/GCTTable?ds_name=DEC_2000_SF1_U&geo_id=04000US16&_box_head_nbr=GCT-PH1&format=ST-2

 

U. S. OF AMERICA SELECTED CITIES HOME/LOT PRICES

 

The Bay Area-Silicon Valley topped The Myers Group’s rankings of projected price inflation among 75 housing markets in the United States, with a forecast increase during this year of 15.7 percent.  The following Home/Lot prices reflect market as of July 2000 (The Myers Group):

 

MARKET

MEDIAN PRICE

APPRECIATION

San Francisco-Oakland-San Jose, CA

$422,500

15.7%

San Diego, Ca

$260,000

12.3%

Los Angeles-Long Beach, CA

$222,000

8.1%

Orange County, CA

$304,000

8.0%

Riverside-San Bernardino, CA

$138,400

7.5%

Houston-Galveston-Brazoria, TX

$112,700

7.0%

Northern and Central New Jersey

$200,000

6.5%

Fort Myers-Cape Coral, FL

$100,500

6.5%

Denver-Boulder-Greeley, CO

$182,000

6.2%

Myrtle Beach, S.C.

$146,700

6.0%

Portland-Salem, OR

$174,000

5.5%

Seattle-Tacoma-Bremerton, WA

$143,700

4.0%

Provo-Orem, Utah

$145,500

3.6%

Boise city, ID

$128,200

3.5%

Reno, NV

$155,000

2.9%

Salt Lake City-Ogden, UT

$141,200

2.4%

 

“In August 2001, the average interest rate on a fixed-rate 30-year mortgage was 8.03 percent.  But that was higher than the 7.94 percent rate in August 1999.  30-year rates stood at 7.88 percent in late September 2000.  The average price of a new home nationally was $203,000.00, up 3 percent from July 2000 average of $197,100."  As reported by Jeannie Averas of the Associated Press, published in the Idaho Statesman in September 2000.

 

2001

 

During the First Quarter of 2001 Single-Family Homes Sold in Canyon County Totaled 513.  The average Home price was $98,394, with the Median Home price at $90,590.  New Home Construction totaled 242, with an average Home price of $101,781 and the Median Home price at $94,000.  Existing Homes sold totaled 271 with an average Home price of $95,370 and the Median Home price at $87,315” (Ref. 4A). http://www.intermountainmls.com/rstats/Can1Q01.html 

 

During the Second Quarter of 2001 Single-Family Homes Sold in Canyon County Totaled 1,258.  The average Home price was $102,353, with the Median Home price at $93,000.  New Home Construction totaled 565, with an average Home price of $104,623 and the Median Home price at $94,700.  Existing Homes sold totaled 693 with an average Home price of $100,503 and the Median Home price at $89,900” (Ref. 4B). http://www.intermountainmls.com/rstats/Can2Q01.html 

 

During the Third Quarter of 2001 Single-Family Homes Sold in Canyon County Totaled 790.  The average Home price was $106,984, with the Median Home price at $98,000.  New Home Construction totaled 366, with an average Home price of $108,424 and the Median Home price at $100,989.  Existing Homes sold totaled 424 with an average Home price of $105,741 and the Median Home price at $92,500” (Ref. 4C). http://www.intermountainmls.com/rstats/Can3Q01.pdf 

 

During the Fourth Quarter of 2001 Single-Family Homes Sold in Canyon County Totaled 739.  The average Home price was $104,584, with the Median Home price at $95,365.  New Home Construction totaled 340, with an average Home price of $105,622 and the Median Home price at $97,181.  Existing Homes sold totaled 399 with an average Home price of $103,700 and the Median Home price at $92,400” (Ref. 4D). http://www.intermountainmls.com/rstats/Can4Q01.pdf 

 

First through Fourth quarters of 2001 total # Single-Family Homes Sold in Canyon County:

QUARTER/YEAR

NEW CONST

EXISTING HOMES

TOTAL LISTING

1st/2001

242

271

513

2nd/2001

565

693

1,258

3rd/2001

366

424

790

4th/2001

340

399

739

TOTAL

1,513

1,787

3,300

 

First through Fourth quarter 2001Monthly Average total # Single-Family Homes Sold in Canyon County by decimal:

 

Canyon County

NEW CONST

EXISTING HOMES

TOTAL LISTING

2001

126.08

148.91

22.91

 

April 1998 to December 2001 total # Single-Family Homes Sold in Canyon County:

 

Canyon County

NEW CONST

EXISTING HOMES

TOTAL LISTING

April to Dec 1998

1,986

2,358

4,344

1999

2,638

2,860

5,498

2000

964

1,382

2,346

2001

1,513

1,787

3,300

TOTAL

7,101

8,387

15,488

 

April 1998 to December 2001 Monthly Average total # Single-Family Homes Sold in Canyon County by decimal:

 

Canyon County

NEW CONST

EXISTING HOMES

TOTAL LISTING

April 1998 to Dec 2001

157.8

186.37

344.17

 

2002

 

During the First Quarter of 2002 Single-Family Homes Sold in Canyon County Totaled 621.  The average Home price was $103,302, with the Median Home price at $94,734.  New Home Construction totaled 299, with an average Home price of $103,804 and the Median Home price at $96,930.  Existing Homes sold totaled 322 with an average Home price of $102,8355 and the Median Home price at $91,000” (Ref. 5A). http://www.intermountainmls.com/rstats/Can1Q02.pdf 

 

Single-Family Homes Sold in Canyon County during 2002 as compared to 2001 by Month/Year:

 

MONTH/YR

LISTING

S. F. HOMES SOLD

AVERAGE

MEDIAN

Reference

01/02

Total Active

180

$103,054

$94,462

(Ref. 5A)

 

Existing

89

$102,320

$89,500

 

 

New Construction

91

$103,772

$95,950

 

01/01

Total Active

148

$96,408

$91,000

(Ref. 4A)

 

Existing

77

$88,920

$84,000

 

 

New Construction

71

$104,530

$94,000

 

02/02

Total Active

255

$109,554

$99,830

(Ref. 5B)

 

Existing

129

$111,601

$95,000

 

 

New Construction

126

$107,459

$101,442

 

02/01

Total Active

270

$107,832

$93,195

(Ref. 4B)

 

Existing

152

$103,754

$89,950

 

 

Canyon County Residential Home Sales statistics provided by Intermountain Multiple Listing Services, Inc (IMLS)

http://www.intermountainmls.com/rstats/CanInterface.html

 

During the Second Quarter of 2002 Single-Family Homes Sold in Canyon County Totaled 831.  The average Home price was $106,576, with the Median Home price at $96,300.  New Home Construction totaled 408, with an average Home price of $105,013 and the Median Home price at $97,787.  Existing Homes sold totaled 423 with an average Home price of $108,083 and the Median Home price at $92,500” (Ref. 5B). http://www.intermountainmls.com/rstats/Can2Q02.pdf  

 

April 1998 through June 2002 Monthly Average total # Single-Family Homes Sold in Canyon County by decimal:

 

Canyon County

NEW CONST

EXISTING HOMES

TOTAL LISTING

April 1998 to June 2002

153.09

179.05

332.14

 

During the Third Quarter of 2002 Single-Family Homes Sold in Canyon County totaled 885. The Average Home price was $109,623, with the Median Home price at $98,158. New Home Construction totaled 430, with an Average Home price of $109,964 and the Median Home price at $99,045. Existing Homes sold totaled 455 with an Average Home price of $109,300and the Median Home price at $95,000” (Ref. 5C). http://www.intermountainmls.com/rstats/Can3Q02.pdf 

 

During the Fourth Quarter of 2002 Single-Family Homes Sold in Canyon County Totaled 837.  The average Home price was $107,573, with the Median Home price at $96,900.  New Home Construction totaled 428, with an average Home price of $108,184 and the Median Home price at $98,908.  Existing Homes sold totaled 409, with an average Home price of $106,934 and the Median Home price at $90,500” (Ref. 5D). http://www.intermountainmls.com/statistics.html

 

First through Fourth Quarters of 2002 total # Single-Family Homes Sold in Canyon County:

QUARTER/YEAR

NEW CONST

EXISTING HOMES

TOTAL LISTING

1st/2002

299

322

621

2nd/2002

408

423

831

3rd/2002

430

455

885

4th/2002

428

409

837

TOTAL

1,974

1,628

2,746

First through Fourth Quarters of 2002 Monthly Average total # Single-Family Homes Sold in Canyon County by decimal:

 

Canyon County

NEW CONST

EXISTING HOMES

TOTAL LISTING

2002

164.5

135.66

228.33

 

The following information reveals four years 6-months solid growth in residential home sales from April 1998 through September 2002, combining all Home Sales for aforementioned time period.

April 1998 through September 2002 total # Single-Family Homes Sold in Canyon County:

 

Canyon County

NEW CONST

EXISTING HOMES

TOTAL LISTING

April to Dec1998

1,986

2,358

4,344

1999

2,638

2,860

5,498

2000

964

1,382

2,346

2001

1,513

1,787

3,300

2002

1,974

1,628

2,746

TOTAL

9,075

10,015

18,234

57-months = new construction, exiting homes and total listing

 

April 1998 through September 2002 Monthly Average total # Single-Family Homes Sold in Canyon County by decimal:

 

Canyon County

NEW CONST

EXISTING HOMES

TOTAL LISTING

April 1998 to Sep 2002

159.21

175.70

319.89

57-months = new construction, exiting homes and total listing

 

April 1998 through December 2002 total # Single-Family Homes Sold in Canyon County:

 

Canyon County

NEW CONST

EXISTING HOMES

TOTAL LISTING

April to Dec 1998

1,986

2,358

4,344

1999

2,638

2,860

5,498

2000

964

1,382

2,346

2001

1,513

1,787

3,300

2002

9,075

10,015

18,234

TOTAL

16,176

18,402

33,722

 

April 1998 through December 2002 Monthly Average total # Single-Family Homes Sold in Canyon County by decimal:

 

Canyon County

NEW CONST

EXISTING HOMES

TOTAL LISTING

2002

159.21

175.701

319.894

 

 2003

 

During the First Quarter of 2003 Single-Family Homes Sold in Canyon County Totaled 663.  The average Home price was $106,322, with the Median Home price at $96,477.  New Home Construction totaled 321, with an average Home price of $109,383 and the Median Home price at $100,190.  Existing Homes sold totaled 342, with an average Home price of $103,449 and the Median Home price at $92,700” (Ref. 6A). http://www.intermountainmls.com/statistics.html

 

Single-Family Homes Sold in Canyon County during 2003 as compared to 2002 by Month/Year:

 

MONTH/YR

LISTING

S. F. HOMES SOLD

AVERAGE

MEDIAN

Reference

01/03

Total Active

192

$103,175

$95,417

(Ref. 6A)

 

Existing

98

$103,175

$95,417

 

 

New Construction

94

$110,109

$103,165

 

01/02

Total Active

180

$103,054

$94,462

(Ref. 5A)

 

Existing

89

$102,320

$89,500

 

 

New Construction

91

$103,772

$95,950

 

02/03

Total Active

113

$107,951

$92,825

(Ref. 6A)

 

Existing

113

$107,951

$92,825

 

 

New Construction

108

$110,560

$99,745

 

02/02

Total Active

255

$109,554

$99,830

(Ref. 5B)

 

Existing

129

$111,601

$95,000

 

 

New Construction

126

$107,459

$101,442

 

 

Canyon County Residential Home Sales statistics provided by Intermountain Multiple Listing Services, Inc (IMLS)

http://www.intermountainmls.com/rstats/CanInterface.html

 

During the Second Quarter of 2003 Single-Family Homes Sold in Canyon County Totaled 914.  The average Home price was $109,625, with the Median Home price at $99,495.  New Home Construction totaled 408, with an average Home price of $110,133 and the Median Home price at $100,777.  Existing Homes sold totaled 506, with an average Home price of $109,215 and the Median Home price at $97,450” (Ref. 6B). http://www.intermountainmls.com/statistics.html

 

During the Third Quarter of 2003 Single-Family Homes Sold in Canyon County Totaled 1,015.  The average Home price was $113,923, with the Median Home price at $100,490.  New Home Construction totaled 448, with an average Home price of $114,049 and the Median Home price at $102,950.  Existing Homes sold totaled 567 with an average Home price of $113,823 and the Median Home price at $97,500” (Ref. 6C). http://www.intermountainmls.com/statistics.html

 

During the Fourth Quarter of 2003 Single-Family Homes Sold in Canyon County Totaled 990.  The average Home price was $109,789, with the Median Home price at $99,952.  New Home Construction totaled 423, with an average Home price of $115,735 and the Median Home price at $105,900.  Existing Homes sold totaled 567, with an average Home price of $105,353 and the Median Home price at $93,000. (Ref. 6D). http://www.intermountainmls.com/statistics.html

 

First through Fourth Quarters of 2003 total # Single-Family Homes Sold in Canyon County:

QUARTER/YEAR

NEW CONST

EXISTING HOMES

TOTAL LISTING

1st/2003

321

342

663

2nd/2003

408

506

914

3rd/2003

448

567

1,015

4th/2003

423

567

990

TOTAL

1,600

1,982

3,582

 

First through Fourth Quarters of 2003 Monthly Average total # Single-Family Homes Sold in Canyon County by decimal:

 

Canyon County

NEW CONST

EXISTING HOMES

TOTAL LISTING

2003

133.33

165.16

298.5

 

April 1998 through December 2003 total # Single-Family Homes Sold in Canyon County:

 

Canyon County

NEW CONST

EXISTING HOMES

TOTAL LISTING

April to Dec 1998

1,986

2,358

4,344

1999

2,638

2,860

5,498

2000

964

1,382

2,346

2001

1,513

1,787

3,300

2002

9,075

10,015

18,234

2003

1,600

1,982

3,582

TOTAL

17,776

20,384

37,304

69-months = new construction, exiting homes and total listing

 

April 1998 through December 2003 Monthly Average total # Single-Family Homes Sold in Canyon County by decimal:

 

Canyon County

NEW CONST

EXISTING HOMES

TOTAL LISTING

2003

257.62

295.42

540.63

69-months = new construction, exiting homes and total listing

 

2004

 

During the First Quarter of 2004 Single-Family Homes Sold in Canyon County Totaled 764.  The average Home price was $114,287, with the Median Home price at $102,272. New Home Construction totaled 307, with an average Home price of $120,965 and the Median Home price at $109,900. Existing Homes sold totaled 457, with an average Home price of $109,802 and the Median Home price at $93,500” (Ref. 7A). http://www.intermountainmls.com/statistics.html

 

Single-Family Homes Sold in Canyon County during 2004 as compared to 2003 by Month/Year:

 

MONTH/YR

LISTING

S. F. HOMES SOLD

AVERAGE

MEDIAN

Reference

01/04

Total Active

196

$112,740

$101,557

(Ref. 7A)

 

Existing

107

$104,231

$89,000

 

 

New Construction

Sold

$117,930

$108,900

 

01/03

Total Active

192

$103,175

$95,417

(Ref. 6A)

 

Existing

98

$103,175

$95,417

 

 

New Construction

94

$110,109

$103,165

 

02/04

Total Active

244

$117,214

$100,742

(Ref. 7A)

 

Existing

140

$116,765

$94,950

 

 

New Construction

104

$117,819

$106,078

 

02/03

Total Active

113

$107,951

$92,825

(Ref. 6A)

 

Existing

113

$107,951

$92,825

 

 

New Construction

108

$110,560

$99,745

 

 

Canyon County Residential Home Sales statistics provided by Intermountain Multiple Listing Services, Inc (IMLS)

http://www.intermountainmls.com/rstats/CanInterface.html

 

At the end of the Second Quarter of 2004, the average price of homes sold in NW Caldwell (Area 1275) was $_____, as compared to the Median price of $_____. Canyon County average price of homes sold at the end of the Second Quarter or June 2003 was $_____, as compared to the median price of $_____” (Ref. 7B).

 

At the end of the Third Quarter of 2004, the average price of homes sold in NW Caldwell (Area 1275) was $_____, as compared to the Median price of $_____. Canyon County average price of homes sold at the end of the Third Quarter or September 2003 was $_____, as compared to the median price of $_____” (Ref. 7C).

 

At the end of the Fourth Quarter of 2004, the average price of homes sold in NW Caldwell (Area 1275) was $_____, as compared to the Median price of $_____. Canyon County average price of homes sold at the end of the Fourth Quarter 2003 was $_____, as compared to the median price of $_____” (Ref. 7D) 23). http://www.intermountainmls.com/statistics.html

 

January through December 2004 total # Single-Family Homes Sold in Canyon County:

Canyon County

NEW CONST

EXISTING HOMES

TOTAL LISTING

1st Qtr 2004

307

457

764

2nd Qtr 2004

Not Reported

Not Reported

 

3rd Qtr 2004

Not Reported

Not Reported

 

4th Qtr 2004

Not Reported

Not Reported

 

YEAR END REPORT

 

 

4,184-764=3,420

TOTAL

307

457

4,184

 

January through December 2004 Monthly Average total # Single-Family Homes Sold in Canyon County by decimal:

Canyon County

NEW CONST

EXISTING HOMES

TOTAL LISTING

2004

102.33

152.33

348.66

3-months = new construction and exiting homes and 12-months = total listing

 

April 1998 through December 2004 total # Single-Family Homes Sold in Canyon County:

 

Canyon County

NEW CONST

EXISTING HOMES

TOTAL LISTING

April to Dec 1998

1,986

2,358

4,344

1999

2,638

2,860

5,498

2000

964

1,382

2,346

2001

1,513

1,787

3,300

2002

9,075

10,015

18,234

2003

1,600

1,982

3,582

Jan to March 2004

307

457

764

YEAR END REPORT

Not Reported

Not Reported

4,184-764=3,420

TOTAL

18,083

20,841

41,488

Canyon County 2004 Year to Date (All listings) = 4,184-764=3,420 = 2nd, 3rd & 4th Qtr (72-months = new construction and exiting homes and 81-months = total listing)

 

April 1998 through December 2004 Monthly Average total # Single-Family Homes Sold in Canyon County by decimal:

 

Canyon County

NEW CONST

EXISTING HOMES

TOTAL LISTING

Apr 1998 to Jun 2004

251.15

289.45

512.19

Canyon County 2004 Year to Date (All listings) = 4,184-764=3,420 = 2nd, 3rd & 4th Qtr (72-months = new construction and exiting homes and 81-months = total listing)

 

Census Bureau Housing Topics http://www.census.gov/hhes/www/housing.html

 

Source U.S. Census Bureau: State and County QuickFacts.

http://www.census.gov/datamap/www/16.html

 

2005

 

First Quarter of 2005 Single-Family Homes Sold in Canyon County Totaled 948.  The average Home price was $126,933, with the Median Home price at $112,445” (Ref. 7B)

http://www.intermountainmls.com/statistics.html

 

First Quarter of 2005 total # Single-Family Homes Sold in Canyon County:

Canyon County

NEW CONST

EXISTING HOMES

TOTAL LISTING

Jan to March

Not Reported

Not Reported

948

3-months = total listing

 

First Quarter of 2005 Monthly Average total # Single-Family Homes Sold in Canyon County by decimal:

Canyon County

NEW CONST

EXISTING HOMES

TOTAL LISTING

Jan to March 2005

Not Reported

Not Reported

316

3-months = total listing

 

April 1998 through March 2005 total # Single-Family Homes Sold in Canyon County:

 

Canyon County

NEW CONST

EXISTING HOMES

TOTAL LISTING

April to Dec 1998

1,986

2,358

4,344

1999

2,638

2,860

5,498

2000

964

1,382

2,346

2001

1,513

1,787

3,300

2002

9,075

10,015

18,234

2003

1,600

1,982

3,582

Jan to March 2004

307

457

764

YEAR END REPORT

Not Reported

Not Reported

4,184-764=3,420

Jan to March 2005

Not Reported

Not Reported

948

TOTAL

18,083

20,841

42,436

Canyon County 2004 Year to Date (All listings) = 4,184-764=3,420 = 2nd, 3rd & 4th Qtr (72-months = new construction and exiting homes and 81-months = total listing)

 

April 1998 through March 2005 Monthly Average total # Single-Family Homes Sold in Canyon County by decimal:

 

Canyon County

NEW CONST

EXISTING HOMES

TOTAL LISTING

Apr 1998 to Mar 2005

251.15

289.45

505.19

Canyon County 2004 Year to Date (All listings) = 4,184-764=3,420 = 2nd, 3rd & 4th Qtr (72-months = new construction and exiting homes and 84-months = total listing)

 

Canyon County Residential Home Sales statistics provided by Intermountain Multiple Listing Services, Inc (IMLS) http://www.intermountainmls.com/rstats/CanInterface.html

 

ADA AND CANYON COUNTIES CITY EXPANSION INFRASTRUCTURE COST   

        AND TAX BASE INCREASE THROUGH ANNEXATION & GROWTH

CHAPTER X - APPENDIX C

CITY EXPANSION INFRASTRUCTURE COST

 

 

Martin S. Johnson of the Idaho Statesman June 13, 1999 report on City Expansion Infrastructure cost:

 

“Homes on larger lots, or farther from a central city, require more infrastructures.  According to local service providers, costs increase with every foot as lot increases in width.

 

Another foot of pressurized irrigation pipe must be laid, at up to $10 a foot.  Replacement cost: $15 a foot.

 

Another foot of residential road must he built, at up to $60 a foot.  The 20-year maintenance cost for that foot:  $30’ for sanding, repair, snow removal and resurfacing.

 

Another foot of gas line must be buried, at up to $4.75 a foot (no replacement estimate available).

 

Another foot of sewer lines must be buried, at up to $25 a foot.  Replacement cost:  $60’.

 

Another foot of water line must be buried, at $18 to $20 a foot, Replacement cost: $30’.

 

Another foot of power line must be buried, at $25 to $35 a foot."  As reported by Martin S. Johnson of the Idaho Statesman June 13, 1999

 

 

CITY TAX BASE INCREASE THROUGH ANNEXATION & GROWTH

 

“In the past 10 years, Nampa arid Meridian has doubled in area, while Boise has increased by 14 percent or greater taking into consideration the annexation of 5-miles radius December 31, 1999."  As reported by Corey Pride of the Idaho Statesman July 2000.

 

Fast-grow­ing Nampa threatens to replace Pocatello as the state's second largest city."  As reported by Tim Woodward of the Idaho Statesman September 24, 2000.

 

"Boise and Meridian rate of annexing land in 1999 was at a rate of about 4.5 acres a day.  The rate grew even more as Boise annexed 5 square miles –2,620-acres, crossing the interstate into Southwest Boise December 31, 1999.  City limits of Meridian and Boise now reach “area of impacts,” just west of Cloverdale Road.  Boise, Meridian and Nampa total growth in mile radius totals an estimated 32 miles taking into consideration Boise annexation of 5- miles radius December 31, 1999.

 

People who live in newly developed areas annexed to the cities cite a variety of reasons for the move; bigger lots, new homes with new conveniences and roads designed to push traffic somewhere else.  They also cite homeowners associations, which control appearance standards.

 

Developers also have incentives to build at the margins.  Inside a city, parcels usually are just a few acres, the land is expensive, there may be problems with road access, and chemicals may contaminate the site.

 

"It's cheaper arid easier to install infrastructure in farm ground, and you don't have neighbors in opposition," developer Bill Clark said.  “Infill is harder, and people frequently object.” 

 

In the surrounding area of Boise, farming grounds are being purchased for residential subdivisions and the ground must be re-zoned and connection to Boise city wastewater disposal must take place, an expense to the developer which is passed to the contractor purchasing lots for homes and even higher cost for homes to the consumer as a result.  Many developers have purchased farms, only to hold the ground in reserve, waiting five to ten years for Boise to expand their own sewage system.

 

Local governments play a big role in directing growth through annexations and tile construction of sewer, parks and other facilities.

 

Planning experts who compared 1990 and 1999 maps of the cities say their sprawling boundaries mean higher costs for public Services, because it's more expensive to extend and maintain services to a spread-out city.

 

Planners say compact city limits make for efficient use of tax dollars arid result in higher population density.  More distant neighborhoods require longer roads, longer sewer lines and more police cars and fire stations, all of which cost money.

 

Extremely low-density development is expensive to service, said J. Thomas Black, an urban development economist and fellow with the Lincoln Institute of land Policy Cambridge Mass.  But high-density development in cities can cost residents more in other areas.

 

There's really no evidence you save money by crowding people in very tightly, and Service costs actually go up when you start getting 4,000 people per square mile.” Black said,  "The theory is you have to spend more money on police and traffic management.  And if you look at the general cost of living, it goes up with density.

 

"Boiseans live with 2,620 people per square mile, Nampans with 2,117, and Meridian residents are lower than Portland, Oregon, which has 3,700 per square mile and often is held up as a model for growth management.

 

"Los Angeles has become the poster child of sprawl, but it has 5,500 people per square mile, and it has the highest density of urbanized areas in the country,” Black said.

 

Density changes over time for example, a 1990 map of Meridian shows a lot of undeveloped land inside its city limits.  Nampa currently has much vacant land, inside its limits, especially in the northeastern part.  That lowers the overall density within the city.

 

Development consultant Chris Korte said people shouldn’t be too quick to label Treasure Valley cities sprawling.  The cities still are evolving and probably will become more compact as time goes on.  "In another 10 years," the Meridian mayor, said, “you'll see differences in the borders and the densities.”  As reported by Tom Shanahan of the Idaho Statesman.

 

 

COMMERCIAL AND MANUFACTURING ACRES HARD TO FIND

WITHIN BOISE MSA

CHAPTER X - APPENDIX D

 

John Tucker of the Idaho Statesman report on Commercial and Manufacturing Acres Hard To Find, September 9, 2000:

 

"Commercial, manufacturing and industrial acreage is becoming scarce in Boise and the surrounding areas, requiring many companies to purchase property for expansion of their manufacturing base in other counties a great distance away. 

 

A lack of vacant industrial buildings and land suitable for new buildings is prompting businesses to move to western Ada County or Canyon County.  In some cases, the lack of developable industrial space has even prompted out-of-state companies to mark Boise off, instead expanding their operations in other large cities.

 

And the most recent real estate statistics show that for Boise, the shortage is getting worse.

 

That's hurting Boise, city officials said, because not only does the city lose the tax base generated by the properties, it loses the jobs that go along with the businesses.

 

It also creates a domino effect, with the employees of companies that move out of Boise selling their homes and moving to the new location in many cases.

 

“There’s a real need for industrial space in Boise,” said Jason White, an industrial leasing specialist with Colliers international Inc.  “It's imperative to Boise's future that more space be built,” White said.  The economic development arm of the city is working to solve the problem, but it will take time for efforts to work, said Jeff Jones, Boise's economic development director.  A mid-year survey by Colliers showed that in July, the vacancy rate for industrial space had dropped to 2.7 percent down from 3.25 percent a year ago.  A typical industrial market has anywhere from 4 to 6 percent vacant space, White said several factors have caused the shortage, including:

 

High demand, with more companies moving to Boise at the same time established Companies are expanding.

 

Difficulty finding large enough pieces of land near city services to build large industrial buildings.  Developers not having the funds to install infrastructure quickly enough to get buildings built in time for the "I want it now" companies emerging in the high-tech world.

 

Residential growth squeezing out sites: that could be used for industry.

 

An example of the effect of the shortage can be found at R & M Steel on State Street in Boise.  When the owners of the company, which makes customized steel buildings, began looking for sites to expand, they found there was nothing within Ada County that suited their needs.  “It’s an absolutely gargantuan expansion for us,” said Nancy Roberts, who owns' the company” with her husband, Rob.  "But we couldn't expand at our present location because residences have pushed right up to our property line.

 

The company found what it was looking for in Caldwell, where it purchased 80-acres enough room for future expansion.  The company is building a 90,0%-square-foot building on the site, big enough to move long lengths of steel around inside.  It has 30 employees and will add at least 10 more when the building is done at the end of September 2000.  “Many of our employees have decided to buy houses in Caldwell,” Roberts said.  She and her husband also are planning on relocating to the Canyon County city.

 

Another example is Western Electronics, which is building a 106,000-square-foot manufacturing plant in Meridian.  The company didn't expand near its Garden City plant because it couldn't find a large enough building.  “We scoured the area looking for the right location,” said Walt Mott, a representative for Boise-based DBSI Group of Companies, the majority owner of Western Electronics.

 

In another case, online auction king eBay Inc. bypassed Boise a year ago when it couldn't find enough space for a large call center, settling instead in Salt Lake City.

 

To solve the industrial land shortage, the Boise is working to build a database of all properties in the city where industrial buildings could he built.

 

Unlike commercial property brokerages, the database will show all properties, not just the ones listed with a particular company for sale.

 

The database will be put online so interested parties can contact the property owners and negotiate for leases.  “It will be especially helpful for companies that need to assemble parcels from multiple owners,” Jones said.

 

The city is also trying to establish a rotating loan fund, where developers would be able to get loans to cover the interest on costs associated with installing infrastructure until a tenant needs a building to go up.  The developer would cover the principal on the loan.

“Companies today are asking for buildings to be completed in six months,” Jones said.  “'That can't be done unless the infrastructure is already in place.”

 

Companies want the space, and they want it now, Mott said.

 

“We've had clients say  ‘If you can build it in six months, we'll take it,” Mott said.  “But we just can't build them that fast.

 

It takes a minimum of four months just to get the permits and other city approvals before a building can even get started, Jones said.”

 

Growth is expansion of Boise, prompted the Boise city council to approve spending $3 million in 2002, in order to purchase property designated for commercial, manufacturing and industrial areas across Interstate 84 from Micron Technology Inc., near the Isaac’s Canyon interchange.  John Tucker of the Idaho Statesman September 24, 2000 reported:  “The council hopes development of a large industrial park will encourage businesses to locate in Boise and deter them from moving to other cities in the valley or – worse yet – to cities outside Idaho.  A report issued in 2000, prepared by Colliers International Inc. estimated that the vacancy rate for industrial properties in Boise had dropped as low as 27 percent in the summer of 2002, meaning very few properties are available for large industrial businesses looking at Boise to expand or relocate.  Boise City Councilman Jerome Mapp said, “There is a lack of industrial space that’s causing businesses to move to other municipalities.”  The land involved is three parcels, totaling 165-acres, two of which adjoin, creating a 130-acre tract between the I-84 Isaac’s Canyon interchange and the Outlet Mall.  Ada County Highway District and the city of Boise have worked out a deal to extend Eisenmam Road to Isaac’s Canyon Interchange."  As reported by John Tucker of the Idaho Statesman September 9, 2000.

 

 

ADA COUNTY (BOISE MSA) COMMERCIAL GROWTH                            

2000 THROUGH 2002

CHAPTER X - APPENDIX E

 

Ada County Profile Idaho Commerce & Labor http://www.idoc.state.id.us

 

City of Boise Home Page http://www.cityofboise.org

 

Meridian Home Page http://www.ci.meridian.id.us

 

Eagle Home Page http://www.eagleidaho.com

 

Kuna Home Page http://www.governet.net/ID/CI/KUN/home.cfm

 

“Although most geographic regions of the United States economy appear to be growing well, there are some areas that offer unusual opportunities for sustained growth, with factors that indicate a thriving local economy for years to come.  The Boise, Idaho region of the northwest is such an area.  Boise and Nampa are positioned on the leading edge of Idaho’s dramatic growth — growth projected to continue for some time to come.

 

Market conditions are solid and continue a 13-year cycle of sustained growth in the greater Boise area.  Southwestern Idaho has a population base of about 300,900, "growing at a rate substantially higher than the national average. Growing at an annual rate of 1.7%, the Census Bureau (in its 2000 census) ranked Idaho the third-fastest growing state this decade for the percentage of population and housing growth, and the Boise-Nampa urban area was ranked the fifth-fastest growing cities this decade.  Since the last official head count on April 1, 1990, Idaho’s population has grown by nearly a quarter of a million people, more than 24 percent.  Only Arizona, at just more than 30 percent, and Nevada, at more than 50 percent, has seen greater growth."

 

"The Census Bureau estimated that in July 2001 Idaho's population was 1,321,006 residents. That was an increase of about 27,053 (2.1%) from the 2000 Census. Of that increase, the Census Bureau estimated that about 3,700 (13.7%) was due to net international migration (immigrant settlement). During the same period there was a net domestic migration increase of about 10,400 from an influx of native-born residents."

 

Employment growth is surging in the Boise Metropolitian Statistical Area (MSA) due to renewed growth in many of the state’s high-tech markets.  Even though agriculture is in a slump 2002, in 2000 non-ag employment growth in the state was expected to slow to 2.2 to 2.6 percent pace in 2001 and 2002.  For the twelve months period ending August 2000, non-ag employment in the Boise MSA increased by close to 4.6 percent, creating 9,600 new jobs compared to the prior twelve-month period.  While this is not the 6.7 percent pace of non-ag employment growth that the Boise MSA experienced in 1993 and 1994, it remains over twice the national rate and one of the fastest growing MSA’s in the U.S.  (John Church, Principal, Idaho Economics, at the Boise Metro Chamber’s Economic Outlook Forum 2000).

 

July 2000 the Gross Domestic Product (GDP) estimation for the next 5 years was 3.2% annually (Idaho Statesman 6/00).

 

“Construction data drops in activity - Idaho Business Review” (Ref. 2).

 

"Building statistics are down by double digits in Boise and around Idaho, reflecting continued economic sluggishness and a lack of new jobs.

The Boise City Construction Report for May showed a 36 percent drop in total construction value for the first five months of the year – $162.6 million compared to $252.2 million a year ago. That compares to $250.3 million for the same period of 2000, $187.6 million in 1999 and $211.9 million in ’98.

Around the state, construction value in 57 municipalities through March dropped 25 percent, to $159.5 million, according to the most recent Wells Fargo Idaho Construction Report.

 

Boise City Planning & Development Services Director Tim Hogland says declines in Boise construction statistics reflect a sluggish economy early this year, a growing trend toward building houses outside Boise city limits, and last year’s cyclical peak in apartment construction.

Several major projects planned in downtown Boise bode well for the future, he said. He cited plans for an additional convention building, a parking structure and commercial building on the Bannock Garage site, a major mixed-use project on Front Street near Fifth, and the University Place and Water Center projects.

Through May, Boise commercial construction value fell by 38 percent to $61.3 million, single-family housing permits declined 28 percent to 373, and permits for apartments fell 63 percent to 180 units. Building permits declined by 12 percent through May, to 5,798. That compares to 6,539 last year, 6,984 in 2000, 6,636 in 1999 and 6,644 in ’98.

The Wells Fargo report indicated non-residential construction value dropped 20.7 percent statewide for the first quarter, to just more than $42.5 million. Alterations and repairs totaled about $27.2 million, down 29.4 percent from a year earlier.
Some 1,653 single-family homes were built in the first quarter, down 8.1 percent from a year ago.  Multi-family units totaled 305, a 57.8 percent drop.

While mortgage interest rates remain low, helping home sales, "there just aren’t any jobs being created on a statewide basis," said Kelly Matthews, Wells Fargo regional economist based in Salt Lake City.

The 8.1 percent reduction in single-family construction through March compares to the 10 percent drop that he predicted in January.
Matthews wonders if even a 10 percent reduction in new housing would be enough to maintain a balance between supply and demand, given the strong buildup of the past several years and the lack of new jobs now.

For now, Idaho home values have held up well and "there is not evidence of significant excess supply in southwest Idaho or statewide," he said.”  A large portion of Idaho housing construction is occurring in Ada and Canyon counties, where home sales remain strong, Matthews said.

Southwest Idaho’s $300.7 million in total construction through March compared to $337.6 million a year earlier, a 10.9 percent drop, Wells Fargo said. Meridian kept pace with year-ago totals while Nampa, Caldwell and Twin Falls posted gains. Unincorporated parts of Ada County saw construction value fall.

North Idaho’s construction value dropped by nearly 46 percent in the first quarter to $43 million, compared to $79.6 million a year earlier. Coeur d’Alene’s $9.1 million compared to $24.4 million through March 2001.

Eastern Idaho’s $29 million total for the quarter compared to $27.9 million in 2001, a 3.9 percent gain. The Idaho Falls total grew from $6.8 million through March 2001 to nearly $11.5 million in the first quarter of this year.

Southeast Idaho posted a 35.9 percent decline, to $20.9 million compared to $32.6 million a year earlier. A bright spot was Pocatello, where first-quarter value went from $4.1 million last year to more than $5.3 million this year."  As reported by  Brad Carlson, June 17, 2002 in Idaho Construction/Business Review” (Ref. 2).
http://www.idahobusiness.net

"The state could receive more than $2 million a year for land it leases to alternative energy companies. A federal study has concluded that Idaho owns 39,500 acres of land with winds that blow hard enough to warrant wind farms. The study says state-owned lands have the potential to produce 660 megawatts, enough juice to power 148,000 homes.

 

"Another $500,000 is going to rural areas to hire regional economic development specialists, who will work with employers interested in moving to their areas."

 

"Growth in Idaho's economy is strong even though agriculture is in a slump.  Cheap hydroelectric power rates are among the lowest in the nation. The relaxed quality of life has attracted national recognition."

 

"Signals are prominent that the family farm in Idaho has shifted to survival mode and that “some producers will be forced to leave production this year,” said Neil Meyer, University of Idaho extension economist who traveled the state last fall for meetings on “Coping with the Current Ag Economy.”

"Factors threatening the farm lifestyle are production at record levels worldwide, declining demand mostly caused by Asian economic problems, excess reserves that drive commodity prices below production costs, and continuing effects of the 1996 Freedom to Farm Act that reduces “market transition payments” over seven years until gone in the year 2003," Neil Meyer, University of Idaho extension. Economist.

"Idaho farmers got more than $262 million in direct government payments last year. The federal government spent more than $600 million on all farm programs during 2001, including the direct payments, research, loans and other programs."

 

"Manufacturing has recently supplanted agriculture as the most important sector of Idaho's economy. Cattle and dairy goods are among the leading agricultural products. Idaho's chief crops are potatoes (for which the state, easily the nation's largest producer, is famous), hay, wheat, peas, beans, and sugar beets. Electronic and computer equipment, processed foods, lumber, and chemicals are the major manufactured items."

 

Boise is the regional hub for government, business, cultural and transportation, making it a viable place to invest and develop. This geographic reality is evidence by the large number of fortune 500 companies having headquarters or major prescience in Boise!  The area is perfectly suited for new business growth and is attracting new businesses at a rapid rate.

 

According to David Birch, president of Cambridge, Mass., based Cognetics Inc., in an interview in The Wall Street Journal, 2000; “Boise is in the top 20 of 24 mid-sized cities as a hotbed for entrepreneurs.”

 

"The May 29, 2000 issue of Forbes magazine announced that Idaho ranks fifth on Forbes list of best places in the United States to do business and advance a career."

 

"The magazine ranked 200 metropolitan regions by eight business categories, including wage and salary growth, job growth and high-tech clustering.  Boise climbed from 49th in 1999 to fifth in 2001."

 

In the year 2000, Idaho was ranked sixth fastest growing state in the U.S. (John Church, Principal, Idaho Economics, at the Boise Metro Chamber’s Economic Outlook Forum 2000).

 

"The city is putting itself on the map as a center for business development, driven by a thriving high-tech industry.  Twenty years ago, Boise had eight high-tech businesses; it now has more than 400.  Spurring the growth is the success of Hewlett-Packard Co. and Micron Technology Inc. and the many local high-tech businesses that have spun off from those two giants.  The city of Boise ranked seventh in the United States for growth in high-tech industry as of the year 2000.  The Boise area is among the top 25 cities for its share of the nation’s technology economy.  The technology sector – which includes Internet, semiconductor and computer companies – employees about 20,000 people in Ada and Canyon Counties."

 

"Other factors in Boise’s high ranking include Idaho’s high level of entrepreneurial spirit; good access to capital, a strong work ethic and pro-business cooperative relationship between government and Idaho’s universities. Quality-of-life factors also played into the ranking."

 

“You can’t transport this quality of life easily,” said Ed Zimmer, chief executive officer at Electronic Controls Co., a Boise firm employing 150. “The major factor behind our growth is the quality of the talent we’ve been able to attract and retain.”

 

Preservation of the past, conservation of natural resources and traditional values maintained from generation to generation, makes the residents of Idaho well positioned for the world tomorrow.

 

“There was a time when Boiseans traveled to Portland or Seattle to shop because they could­n't find the fashion they wanted locally.  Those days are long gone.  With a growing retail scene across the Trea­sure Valley, sophisticated styles and trend-setting fashion for both women and men have come to town."  As reported by the Idaho Statesman September 24, 2000” (Ref. 1).

http://cityguide.entertainmentidaho.com

 

"Downtown was struggling when Moore and Larry Leasure created the Marketplace from old warehouses. It was seen as a destination that would attract businesses and consumers downtown. And it figured to benefit greatly if a regional shopping mall – envisioned in downtown Boise since the 1960s – materialized nearby.  Moore and Leasure sold the development to a Chicago company for about $9.8 million. But the downtown mall never came, tenants left 8th Street Marketplace – complaining of high rents and minimal promotion – and the complex went broke.

Owners sought to reorganize through a Chapter 11 bankruptcy in the late 1980s. The development ended up in the hands of two savings and loans – which themselves got into financial trouble and were taken over by federal regulators, along with the Marketplace, in 1990.

Boise resident Al Marsden acquired it for $1.55 million, and later sold it to S-Sixteen for an undisclosed amount." As reported by by Brad Carlson.  Information obtained from an article Published in Idaho Business Review and is not the full report” (Ref. 2).

http://www.idahobusiness.net

 

"Eighth Street Marketplace occupies 6 acres bordered by Front, Myrtle and Ninth streets, and Capitol Boulevard. The site includes four office-retail buildings and two vacant buildings totaling about 250,000 square feet."  As reported by by Brad Carlson, Idaho Business Review.
 

"8th Street Marketplace offers an old-world village shopping experience. The main building is set in an old warehouse that was renovated in 1977 into a multi-level enclosed mall. It features an eclectic blend of shops and restaurants, and, it's in the heart of Boise's burgeoning Cultural District"” (Ref. 1).

 

"Thomas Kinkade Gallery appears to be the only national retail tenant. Restaurant tenants include Milford’s Fish House, Café Ole, the Kulture Klatsch and Ha’ Penny Bridge Irish Pub.

 

Occupancy peaked in 1987, after which competition emerged in the form of the Boise Towne Square mall, Clark said. Over the years, S-Sixteen has continued to make improvements to the property, redeveloped by Winston Moore in 1977."  As reported by By Brad Carlson, Idaho Business Review” (Ref. 2).

 

"The 8th Street Marketplace recently has expanded. Other downtown boutiques include Precious Metal Arts, Decor Creations, Esse Baby and Purple Sage." (Ref. 1)

 

"S-Sixteen, the J.R. Simplot family limited partnership, hopes to sell 8th Street Marketplace, contracting with George Iliff, managing principal with Colliers International to sale the property for sale.

 

"There are more than 3 acres of parking lots – at Capitol and Front, Capitol and Myrtle, and the Foster warehouse lot at Eighth, Broad and Front streets – where multi-story buildings with parking, retail, office and possibly even residential space could be constructed." As reported by By Brad Carlson, Idaho Business Review” (Ref. 2).

 

Downtown Boise's skyline continued to change with construction expansion of an estimated 200 million dollars projected in 2000.

"Across the street from The 8th Street Marketplace, you'll find Faust Furniture, well known for it's velvet chaise lounges and over-stuffed giant chairs to funky glassware and knickknacks and a little slice of L.A.-style fashion boutique at Piece Unique.  For dining, the area offers the intimate European bistro and wine bar Berryhill and Co. and the area's premier vegetarian restaurant, Kulture Klatsch.

 

Boise Towne Square opened 12 years ago with 99 stores. Today, the largest mall in Idaho, Boise Town Square, boasts 200 merchants with more on the way.  The 1.33 million square feet of retail space, 95 percent of which is leased, is on the comer of Frankin Road and Milwaukee Street, just off I-84.  Boise Towne Square is the largest mall in the region, with the closest similarly sized shopping area in Portland or Salt Lake City.

 

Boise Towne Square recently underwent an expansion. The most recently added stores include Ann Taylor, Banana Republic, Gap, Limited Too and Brookstone.

 

Retail is still booming in Boise," said Cathy Sullivan, regional marketing director for the mall. "National retailers who have overlooked us in the past are now giving it the eye."

 

Down Town Boise offers a mix of boutiques and department store shopping. It stretches from the Bon Marche department store on the block between l0th and 9th streets on Idaho Street to the Dragonfly boutique at 4th and Main streets.  In between is a collection of fashion bou­tiques such as Ishi, which offers a blend of classes, ethnic flavored women's clothing, Purple Sage, with a flair for bringing lacy old fash­ioned styles into a contemporary light and Bar­bara Barbara, a long-time local favorite with a mix of kicky and comfortable contemporary styles.  Alexander Davis, in the Hoff Building at 812 Bannock St, offers a selection of men's business and casual wear.

 

For men's fashion, Alexander Davis, in the Hoff Building at 812 Bannock St., offers a selection of business and casual wear that includes Hickey Freeman, Austin Reed, Kenneth Cole and Hart Schaffner & Marks"” (Ref. 1).

 

"Scott Stewart, Patrick Laney and Gary Benoit formed the development firm Stewart Laney Benoit (SLB) in 1999 and the partners have a 20-year record in land development in Boise.  In late 1999, the company purchased 44,000-square foot Sonna Building on the northwest corner of 9th and Main streets in Boise." As reported by John Tucker of the Idaho Statesman October 6, 1999.

 

"The 9th Street Center, at 9th and Idaho streets offers sweet-smelling Lavender, with its own essential oil blends, Crabtree & Evelyn and others, connected to Kandor, which offers everything stylish for your kitchen. You can also find unique, one-of-a-kind jewelry at Perpetual Metals, R. Grey Jewelry Gallery and Michael Rogers' Precious Metal Arts.

 

The Boise shopping scene received a huge boost when Dillard's Department Store opened a new wing. The chain, based in Little Rock, Ark., beefed up Boise's designer reper­toire with lines such as DKNY, Dana Buch­man, Ellen Tracy for women, Claiborne, Perry Ellis and DKNY for men.  Since Dillard's opened in August 1998, the Bon Marche underwent a facelift and expan­sion that includes a Mac Cosmetics annex, greatly expanded clothing departments and makeup counters and a shoe department with a plethora of delicious imported shoes.

 

Other national retailers that recently joined the mall include Ann Taylor, Banana Republic, Eddie Bauer, Abercrombie & Fitch, The Dis­ney Store in the mall, and Linens N' Things and Old Navy across the parking lot. 

 

The mall is currently 98 percent occupied, but with more stores on the way.  Those new stores will join fashion favorites such as funky Limited Express and Mr. Raggs.  The Limited and Limited Too, for kids, Victo­ria's Secret, Regis, J.C. Penny's and Sears. 

 

t's not just fashion.  The mall offers Idaho specialty foods and crafts at Made in Idaho, the latest releases and your favorite classics at Sun coast Video, Music land and others.  It offers the traditional mall fare with pizza-by-the-slice, ice cream and burgers. It also of­fers national chain restaurants such as Olive Garden, Old Chicago and Sizzler.

 

Boise Factory Outlet, off of 1-84 at the Gowen Road exit, 6852 Eisenman Road, features 23 outlet shops filled with factory direct savings and "gives kids a place to play, too. While mom and dad shop, kids can slide over to the nearby Idaho IceWorld, featuring two indoor ice rinks." 

 

On the fash­ion end you can find Coldwater Creek, Bugle Boy, Full Size Fashions, Dress Barn, Levi's Outlet-By Most, Payless Shoe Source, Carter's Children swear and Big Dog Sportswear.

 

The newest stores in this outdoor mall are American Outdoor Recreation, Coldwater Creek, Leather Loft and Kitchen Collections. The outlet mall also offers house wares at Corning Revere, The Kitchen Collection and Welcome Home, a collection of home decor ac­cessories.  It's also the home of Rocky Mountain Chocolate Factory and Idaho Ice World, with year-round public skating in a National Hock­ey League regulation size rink"” (Ref. 1).

 

“Other major stores that have established a presence in the Treasure Valley include Wal-Mart Stores Inc.  Wal-Mart opened large "Supercenter" stores in Caldwell, Nampa and Mountain Home in the Sumner of 2000.  It also is constructing a Supercenter in Meridian and is turning its Boise store into a 216,000-square-foot Supercenter.  The giant stores employ between 200 and 500 people.  Besides retail stores, the Treasure Valley has attracted numerous high-tech companies.

 

Wal-Mart Super Center at Glenwood and State Streets in Garden City and Fred Meyer's new store on Federal Way, with another slated to begin construction at Franklin Road and Orchard Street in 2001.  This second Fred Meyer store will replace an older neighborhood shopping mall at that location. 

 

WinCo foods recently opened a new grocery store in Meridian, and as plans for a similar store in the Eagle area.  In addition, building permits were issued to Home Depot store on Federal Way." As reported by John Tucker of the Idaho Statesman September 24, 2000.

 

“Nearly 147,000 square feet of new retail space was added in Ada County in the first half of 2000.  The overall vacancy rate remained nearly unchanged at 6.3 percent over the same period 1999."  As reported by Commercial Report, Knipe & Knipe.

 

“The addition of many national franchise stores into the Boise Metropolitian Statistical Area (MSA) is evidence of the confidence that national corporations have in the Boise retail market.  That confidence is not surprising.  Demographics USA estimated that 1998 retail sales in the Boise MSA we’re nearly 4.7 billion.  They forecast MSA retail sales to exceed $6.6 billion by 2003, and recent figures indicate that expectation may be met.  Retail sales in 1999 approached $5.1 billion, which trends indicating a $320 million increase 2000."  As reported by Todd Boothe, General Manager, RC Willey Home Furnishings, Inc., at the Boise Metro Chamber’s Economic Outlook Forum 2000.

 

"Meridian Crossroads on the southeast corner of Eagle Road and Fairview Avenue in Meridian brings 14 acres of clothing, office supplies, outdoor goods, food and discount stores and other businesses to this fast growing city. Tenants include ShopKo, Macey's Food and Drug, Office Depot and Old Navy” (Ref. 1).

 

The Treasure Valley boasts close to a dozen large corporate headquarters, making it unique for a Community its size.  The area also is home to a growing number of small busi­nesses and startup companies.  But like business communities across the country, mergers, acquisitions and Consolidations are shaping things up.

 

Construction contractor Morrison Knudsen Corp. announced in early July 2000 that it is changing its name to Washington Group International Inc.

 

The name change came as the company ac­quired the engineering and construction divi­sion of Raytheon Engineers & Constructors, a defense and aerospace conglomerate.

 

The acquisition Creates a company that will have $5 billion a year in revenues, employ 38,000 people and be the fourth largest engi­neering and Construction company in the Unit­ed States. 

 

Company officials said they regretted drop-ping the Morrison Knudsen name.  MK is one of Boise's oldest corporate icons, founded in 1912 by Harry Morrison and Morris Knudsen with a Couple of wheelbarrows, a string of horses and $600 they borrowed."  As reported by John Tucker of the Idaho Statesman September 24, 2000.

 

According to a survey done by the AGC, 65 percent of its 750 Idaho Members were planning to build projects at the same pace or greater in 1999.

 

Scott Stewart, Patrick Laney and Gary Benoit formed the development firm Stewart Laney Benoit (SLB) in 1999.  The partners have a 20-year record in land development in Boise.  In late 1999, the company purchased 44,000-square foot Sonna Building on the northwest corner of 9th and Main streets in Boise.

 

Area organizations are community supportive in Idaho.  Boise Family Downtown YMCS at 1050 W. State recently remolded its facility.  The project included new swimmining pools, a youth activity center, snack bar area, rooftop playground, special-needs locker rooms and lots of other new equipment. 

 

The more than $7.5 million project added about 24,000 square feet to the facility."  As reported by Johnna Espinoza of the Idaho Statesman September 24, 2000. 

 

The value of building permits issued in Boise for the first three months of 2000 was nearly 30 percent below the same period in 1999, according to an Idaho Construction Report issued by First Security Corp.  During the first quarter of 2000, $10.3 million in permits were issued for commercial projects in Boise.  That compared to $14.6 million during the same period in 1999.  Since the time the construction report was printed, however, permits valued at $22.3 million for the 25-story Boise Tower project and at $25.9 million for the first phase of the Ada County Court House project were issued.  Many projects across the city also are in the process of obtaining permits to get started.  Commercial construction for August 2000 in Boise jumped 93 percent, with permits issued for $46.4 million in work.  In August 1999, there were permits issued for $24 million.  Year to date through August, commercial construction is up 58 percent, reaching approximately $204 million. As reported by John Tucker of the Idaho Statesman.

 

2000 developments announced to commence:

 

Ada County Courthouse and its $45 mil­lion commercial segment;

 

$42 million public library and $8 million southeast branch library;

 

The Family Center Retail project on Federal Way;

 

Luke’s Meridian Medical Center around Eagle Road exit on Interstate 84;

 

A $12.6 million recreation center is planned at Boise State University, which hosted the NCAA women's gymnastics finals and NCAA track finals in1999, and will host the first and second rounds of the NCAA men's basketball tournament and in 2000 hosted the women's Sweet 16.

 

A mere gener­ation ago the Boise-Borah High School Football game was the athletic event of the year.

 

Security provisions make terminal project more complex - Idaho Business Review (Ref. 2)  http://www.idahobusiness.net

 

Boise Airport terminal building and Airport Expansion: 

 

"The current project includes a 361,000-square-foot terminal building with a two-level roadway system, additional airplane space and increased parking. Layton Construction of Sandy, Utah, is building the roughly $47million terminal, Anderson said, while McAlvain Construction, Inc., Boise, is building an $8 million roadway.
 
The terminal building "seems to be basically on schedule," said Anderson, with the likely addition of about 10 contract days due to modifications of the project.

"We originally said the middle of February (for completion), and we’re still hopeful of that, but probably by mid-March at this rate," he said.

The $8 million roadway system, including an elevated roadway, "seems to be on schedule with very few change orders," said Anderson. Completion of that project is slated for early August.


The roadway will be built out "so that we can add the second part of the terminal building in front, which allows us to double the size of our ticketing and baggage claim area," Anderson said.

But the completion of these projects may be followed quickly by consideration of new expansion, since the growth in usage at the airport has been "faster than anyone anticipated," said Anderson.

The project scope was intended to meet what Anderson termed passenger level 1, "which is supposed to get us through 1.5 million annual in-plane passengers, which we’ve done."

"We’re actually down to 1.4 million because we lost about 10 percent of our traffic because of 9-11, but we pretty much built to the level we’ve already reached."

"When we started this we didn’t think we’d reach this level for another five years," he said. "But the growth just went faster than anyone predicted."

Anderson said American Eagle, Frontier and America West came aboard at the airport after the original projects were set in motion.

"We’re essentially completely full in our ticketing positions in the ticket lobby," said Anderson. In the concourses, "we’re out of room to park all of the airplanes that are here overnight on jetways, and we’re scrambling to find places for them."

"We need to evaluate whether it’s time to start building on another new concourse. When this project is completed we’ll probably either build another concourse, add more ticketing (space) or add another parking garage, or we’ll do all three. That’s looking more true than ever."  As reported by By Ken Levy, Special to IBR.  Information obtained from an article Published in Idaho Construction Review and is not the full report” (Ref. 2).
http://www.idahobusiness.net

 

Renovation of ex-armory slated - 65-year-old WPA building to get major remodeling” (Ref. 2).

 

"It’s one of the largest WPA projects secured by Tourtelette & Hummel during the 1930s." – Sandra Cavanaugh.  "There were a lot of things that were so destroyed we just removed them." – Sandra Cavanaugh
 
"A non-profit theater company is raising about $7 million needed to renovate the historic Boise Armory on Reserve Street into a state-of-the-art theater complex that will feature three performance areas.

The vintage 1937 Art Deco armory was a Works Project Administration endeavor and is "an excellent representative example of Tourtelette & Hummel's Depression Era design work," said Sandra Cavanaugh, artistic director of The New Heritage Theatre Co.

"It is also significant as one of the largest WPA projects secured by Tourtelette & Hummel during the 1930s, and is one of the largest state institutional buildings designed by this firm," she said.

While TNHTC plans extensive renovations to the 47,000 square-foot interior, it intends to retain many original construction elements cited in listing the building on the register of National Historical Places in 1999."  As reported by Ken Levy, Special to the IBR.  Information obtained from an article Published June 17, 2002 in Idaho Construction Review and is not the full report” (Ref. 2)

http://www.idahobusiness.net

 

Hedrick refocuses, negotiates as public projects dwindle - Storage units provide latest work niche - Idaho Business Review (Ref. 2)

 

"Scott Hedrick Construction Inc. located in Boise, is actively involved in Idaho's commercial growth. The Boise-based general contractor has several large public works projects to its credit as well.

Ada County and McCall projects include:

 

Boise City Fire Station No. 10, completed in 1990, the project, valued at about $1.197 million, was a joint station used by the city and the Federal Aviation Administration at the Boise Air Terminal.


Scott Hedrick Construction Inc. has been building storage units and office buildings for Avest LP, Boise. That firm is the parent company of Stor-it, and Hedrick has built numerous projects for them over the past seven years.

 

Hedrick recently completed a 23 storage-building complex and a building off ParkCenter Boulevard for Avest LP, Boise, Hedrick said. The latter was valued at about $2.1 million. Hedrick is building more storage units for that company at Locust Grove and Fairview Avenue, and in Meridian at Ten Mile and Cherry Lane.

"(Hedrick) has built hundreds of thousands of square feet of storage for us," said Scott Weber, construction asset manager for Avest, "including 200,000 square feet at our Locust Grove, ParkCenter and Maple Grove locations."

Weber said Hedrick also built the company’s South Shore Plaza, a 5,800-square-foot office building at Lexington and ParkCenter, and a 1,300-square-foot Stor-it Plaza office suite at Maple Grove.

 

Hedrick is about to embark on a senior housing project in Eagle for Mercy Housing.

Mary Pridmore, vice president of Mercy Housing, said that project is divided into two parts: 20, two-bedroom units for low-income senior housing, funded by HUD, and 49 units of low-income senior housing funded by the HUD-sponsored Tax Credits and Home Fund.

Community Development Block Grant funds covered about $420,000 of the cost of the latter project, which consists of 30, one-bedroom units, 18, two-bedroom units plus a manager’s apartment.  Development and construction costs are valued at about $7 million, she said.

The project is going through the design review process, according to Pridmore, and Hedrick could get started on the 49-unit phase by Sept. 1.

 

Hedrick also built a 4,600-square-foot custom home in Kings Pines estates in McCall for Avest. In all, Hedrick has done about $7 million in work for Avest LP, Weber said. Additional storage sites covering hundreds of thousands of square feet are planned, said Weber.

Among his more unique private-sector projects, Hedrick is working on the McCall Ice Rink and Event Center. The $5.4 million project, funded by the Rich Sabala Foundation, is a 20,000 square-foot building with an 85-foot by 200-foot ice surface. The center includes bleachers and concessions.

"We were involved with that from the day it was conceived," said Hedrick. "We were negotiated in as construction manager and general contractor on that project."

Also in McCall, Hedrick is building an 85-room, $5.7 million Holiday Inn motel and convention center in McCall for Bob Hunt.

Hedrick also does some high-end residential construction, including a 6,000-square-foot home for Albertson’s CEO Larry Johnston and another 6,000-square-foot home for Rick Belluzzo, president of Microsoft, he said.

The company was the general contractor for the 22,000 square foot auditorium at Borah High School. Completed in September 1999, the $3.2 million complex seats 967 and has a full theater stage with curtains and theatrical lighting with catwalk.  Hedrick got his background and experience while working with his father, Win, as partners, beginning in 1979. By 1982, Scott had launched his own firm.

"All my experience comes from working with my dad," he said. "He had the real estate company (Hedrick & Bodine Realty), he developed a lot of subdivisions and did some commercial construction."

When father and son partnered, Scott said his goal was to do more commercial work, especially public-works projects.

The firm did about $28 million in sales in 2001, he said, and "it would appear we’ll be pretty close to that again this year."

The firm employs about 45, including four project managers and 10 field superintendents, with the balance comprised of carpenters and other professional construction personnel."   As reported by Ken Levy, Special to the IBR.  Information obtained from an article Published June 17, 2002 in Idaho Construction Review and is not the full report” (Ref. 2)
http://www.idahobusiness.net

 

To accommodate growth at the outskirts, in 2000, the Meridian City Council commenced planning to install $8.3 million in sewer lines in coming years.  "If Meridian didn't do it, Boise would do it for us and those places would be in Boise," Meridian Mayor Robert Corrie said.  "If we did nothing, we'd be surrounded by Nampa and Boise, and Meridian would be a city of small size, without the residential or commercial tax base."

 

The land southwest of Meridian is higher in elevation, making sewers more expensive.  So officials don't plan to extend pipes to these areas, and they won't see much growth.  Widening a road will suddenly prime the land along it for development.  For example, developers plan large shopping and office centers along Eagle Road.  These projects, which will generate tens of thousands of car trips, weren't feasible until the road was widened recently.

 

Meridian was once considered the bedroom community of Boise.  While people worked and played in the capital city, they lived in Meridian. ­  But that has changed.  Within the past five years, high technology businesses like Crucial Technologies, http://www.crucial.com  Jabil Circuit, http://www.jabil.com Micron Electronics http://www.micron.com Execu-Net, http://www.execunet.com  and New Western Electronics http://www.westernelectronics.com  have been calling the Western Ada County city home.  Industry officials say the city's central locati­on in the valley makes it a natural hot spot for his growth in technology-based develop­ment.  The arrival of Shopko, Fred Meyer, R.C. Willey and Home Depot have given Meridian residents little reason for traveling to Boise for they’re shopping needs.  But Meridian has a feel for its agricultural past, and its rural influence lives on.

 

"Boise-based contract manufacturer Western Electronics announced plans August 2, 2000, to double its total space and manufacturing capacity by constructing a 100,000-square-foot building on Overland Road just south of the Meridian Road interchange off Interstate 84. 

 

The 7.5-acre parcel is part of a 35-acre parcel DBSI, a Boise-based real estate and investment entity, has majority ownership in. DBSI also owns apartment buildings and develops commercial centers, including two planned on opposite corners of Glenwood Street in the Garden City-northwest Boise area.

 

In addition to increasing production capacity with more space and equipment, the new Meridian building will have a gym and day-care facility, said Reeve. Parts of the new building will have two stories. BRS Architects and McAlvain Construction, both Boise, are designer and builder, respectively, of the tilt-up concrete structure. A project cost estimate was not released. Western Electronics occupies a total of 55,000 square feet of leased space in buildings on 43rd Street in Garden City and on Karcher Road in Nampa. The company also has three manufacturing locations in the Portland area and one in Eugene, Ore. 

 

In 2000 sales offices operated in Utah, Washington and California." As reported by Brad Carlson, Idaho Business Review - "Western Electronics to Double Total Space and Manufacturing Capacity, Boise, Idaho, August 2, 2000.  (Ref. 3A) http://www.westernelectronics.com/press/20000802.html

 

"It was announced June 19, 2002 by Western that Oregon-based Melvina Alexander and Washington-based James Lowrey would join Westerns expanding National Sales Force.   Joe Rarick, existing sales executive for Western Electronics specializing in sheetmetal, machining, plating and custom painting products, will remain in his current responsibilities." (Ref. 3B) http://www.westernelectronics.com/press/new.htm

 

 "August 2000, Western Electronics employee base was approximately 400, including 125 working in buildings in Garden City, Nampa, and two facilities in Oregon.  Western's company-wide employment is up approximately 150 since new owners took over and made the decision to expand operations significantly, said Var Reeve, president and CEO. 

 

Reeve, a three-year Western Electronics manager, worked on operations and sales sides of the business before being named president.  Boisean John Wasden, who founded the company in 1978, previously owned Western. Reeve said Western's business volume has roughly tripled since the November 2000 ownership change, largely because new owners invested heavily in new and additional equipment so Western could offer more services and in order to pursue larger contracts.

 

The company appears on its way to reaching its $50 million revenue goal for 2000, he said, adding that another goal is to have more than 300 employees at the Meridian building when it becomes fully operational. Western was awarded an approximately $2.5 million contract with a company that designs hardware for high-speed Internet connections, in 2000, Reeve said.  He would not identify this client, for which Western is providing manufacturing services.

 

Western also secured a contract for "significantly more" than $2.5 million to assemble computer projection devices for another client he would not identify. The company's outlook, and desired result, is "to keep landing deals and just keep going up" in employment, Reeve said.  The tight Boise-area labor market (Ada County unemployment: 2.6 percent) makes recruitment a challenge, he noted.

 

Company services include the manufacture and assembly of printed circuit boards, electromechanical assemblies, wire-harnessing equipment, and over-molded cable assemblies uniting computer-related wiring in a molded covering. Other services include a proprietary "vacuum metallization" process for certain types of shielding, painting and power coating, and pad printing.

 

Reeve said his company has been taking a broader approach recently, offering more services and trying to "vertically integrate" so it produces more finished products and "not just parts." Many clients, he noted, "are demanding more turn-key, final, electromechanical assemblies" such as complete power supply units for large pieces of laser equipment. Low and medium-volume runs are Western's niche, Reeve said, noting that Western competes with Kimball Manufacturing, Boise (IBR, 6-5-00) and large-volume contract manufacturer Jabil Circuit, Meridian (IBR, 5-22-00) aired expansion plans in the past month.

 

MCMS in Nampa is another large-volume specialist that has reported major growth."  As reported by Brad Carlson, Idaho Business Review - "Western Electronics to Double Total Space and Manufacturing Capacity, Boise, Idaho, August 2, 2000” (Ref. 3A).

 

"According to James Lowrey, Western Electronics provides to their customers a fully integrated solution which means Western Electronics can take their customer's printed circuit assemblies, chassis, cable assembly with custom molding, custom harness assemblies with domestic and off shore materials acquisition to accomplish final assembly, test and finished goods distribution to the end customer. 

 

Western provides excellent products and services under a new trademark "eSCM SolutionsTM". Their goal is to provide seamless Supply Chain Management products and services starting with prototype design for manufacturing and testability, material procurement, prototyping, order entry, manufacturing and distribution/fulfillment. With these new products, all aspects of Supply Chain Management (SCM) are brought into focus, including: Customer Relationship Management, Supply Demand Network, Order Processing, Manufacturing and Distribution." (Ref. 3B).

 

"Jabil Circuit began Idaho operations in August, 1998 when the company acquired the assets of Hewlett-Packard's Laser Jet Solutions Group Formatter Manufacturing Organization (FMO).  As part of that deal, Jabil purchased the printed-circuit assembly assets of the FMO operations in Boise, Idaho and Bergamo, Italy for $80 million. Jabil operated on the HP campus in West Boise until it moved its 450 Boise employees to the new plant in Meridian in January.

 

Butch Edwards, Senior Vice President of Operations, said the expansions are in response to significant industry growth and Jabil's own organic growth.  "We are responding to explosive industry growth, expanding to meet current needs as well as readying ourselves for the exponential industry growth we expect in coming years," Edwards said. In June 2000 the St. Petersburg, Florida based Jabil, said it would expand its Meridian manufacturing facility.  It has grown from about $300 million in annual revenues in 1990 to revenues of $2 billion in 1999.

 

Randy Della, senior director of operations said ground breaking for the expansion was scheduled July 2000 and construction would last for six months.  The site in 2000 included about 170,000 square feet of manufacturing and office space on 50-acres.  Della said Jabil would add about 98,000 square feet – about 75,000 square feet of which will be manufacturing space, doubling its manufacturing space and creating additional office areas.  “The company plans to expand to about 300,00 square feet of space within the next two to three years,” Meridian Mayor Robert Corrie said.  A portion of land adjacent to Jabil's Meridian facility in 2000 was being groomed for use by the city as two soccer fields.  This expansion will not affect those areas.

 

Jabil will become the sixth major electronics-manufacturing firm with its own plant in the Treasure Valley.  The expansion could lead to as many as 700 new positions during the next few years, according to Randy Della, Senior Director of Operations. "The continued success and growth of Jabil Circuit is a testament to the commitment and skills of our employees around the globe," Della said. "We are excited that Idaho's contribution to that growth warrants doubling our manufacturing space within six months of moving to our Meridian site."

 

Most of Jabil's worldwide facilities are, or have recently, expanded.  Currently, the company is expanding its California, Michigan, Massachusetts and Florida sites, as well as its sites in Malaysia and Chihuahua, Mexico. Earlier this year, Jabil also announced plans to build a new facility in Hungary and the acquisition of manufacturing capacity in Brazil. "We are responding to explosive industry growth, expanding to meet current needs as well as readying ourselves for the exponential industry growth we expect in coming years," Edwards said.

 

Jabil Circuit, Inc. is an electronic manufacturing service provider for international electronic companies in the communications, computer peripheral, personal computer, automotive and consumer products industries. Jabil offers circuit design, board design from schematic, mechanical design, prototype assembly, volume board assembly, system assembly and direct fulfillment services from 20 automated manufacturing facilities in the North America, Latin American, Europe and Asia."  Information obtained from Jabil Circuit, Inc., Press Release St. Petersburg, Florida, June 15, 2000 (NYSE:JBL) and an article by John Tucker of the Idaho Statesman in July 2000" (Ref. 4).  http://www.jabil.com

 

In 2000, the city of Meridian commenced plans to build two more fire stations in up coming years, at a cost of about $1.5 million, or about $130 per household. Growth of Meridian residential subdivisions make it necessary to bring Fire Stations closer as about one-fourth of Meridian residents at the close of 2000 were outside the recommended 1.5-mile radius of a fire station."  As reported by Shanahan of the Idaho Statesman.

 

"In meridian, permits for commercial construction issued during the first quarter nearly tripled.  Permits valued at $9.6 million for new Meridian commercial projects were issued during the first three months of 2000, compared to $3.5 million in permits last year.  Much of that is tied to construction of the St. Luke’s Meridian Medical Center.  Work is in progress to add a six-story, 182,600-square-foot wing to the hospital complex.  To the west of the hospital, a Holiday Inn Express hotel and several professional and retail buildings are also under construction."  As reported by John Tucker of the Idaho Statesman.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

EQNEEDF views on Politics, Environment, Energy, Health, National, and Foreign Affairs

                                ENERGY QUEST, former National Energy Efficient Development Inc.

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