This report allows for home value evaluation from 1998 to 2005 and was not part of the Montebello Book.

 

ADA AND CANYON COUNTY RESIDENTIAL AND COMMERCIAL GROWTH AND

RESIDENTIAL HOME SALES/PRICES FROM 1998 to April 2005

CHAPTER X Appendix F to I, App. I, A100 to A200

 

 

CANYON COUNTY COMMERCIAL GROWTH 2000 THROUGH 2002

CHAPTER X - APPENDIX F

 

 

 

Nampa Home Page http://www.ci.nampa.id.us

 

Caldwell Home Page http://www.caldwell@ci.caldwell.id.us

 

Idaho Commerce & Labor http://www.idoc.state.id.us

 

“Although most geographic regions of the United States economy appear to be growing well, there are some areas that offer unusual opportunities for sustained growth, with factors that indicate a thriving local economy for years to come.  The Boise, Idaho region of the northwest is such an area.  Boise and Nampa are positioned on the leading edge of Idaho’s dramatic growth — growth projected to continue for some time to come.

 

Market conditions are solid and continue a 13-year cycle of sustained growth in the greater Boise area.  Southwestern Idaho has a population base of about 300,900, "growing at a rate substantially higher than the national average. Growing at an annual rate of 1.7%, the Census Bureau (in its 2000 census) ranked Idaho the third-fastest growing state this decade for the percentage of population and housing growth, and the Boise-Nampa urban area was ranked the fifth-fastest growing cities this decade.  Since the last official head count on April 1, 1990, Idaho’s population has grown by nearly a quarter of a million people, more than 24 percent.  Only Arizona, at just more than 30 percent, and Nevada, at more than 50 percent, has seen greater growth."

 

"The Census Bureau estimated that in July 2001 Idaho's population was 1,321,006 residents. That was an increase of about 27,053 (2.1%) from the 2000 Census. Of that increase, the Census Bureau estimated that about 3,700 (13.7%) was due to net international migration (immigrant settlement). During the same period there was a net domestic migration increase of about 10,400 from an influx of native-born residents."

 

Employment growth is surging in the Boise Metropolitian Statistical Area (MSA) due to renewed growth in many of the state’s high-tech markets.  Even though agriculture is in a slump 2002, in 2000 non-ag employment growth in the state was expected to slow to 2.2 to 2.6 percent pace in 2001 and 2002.  For the twelve months period ending August 2000, non-ag employment in the Boise MSA increased by close to 4.6 percent, creating 9,600 new jobs compared to the prior twelve-month period.  While this is not the 6.7 percent pace of non-ag employment growth that the Boise MSA experienced in 1993 and 1994, it remains over twice the national rate and one of the fastest growing MSA’s in the U.S.  (John Church, Principal, Idaho Economics, at the Boise Metro Chamber’s Economic Outlook Forum 2000).

 

“July 2000 the Gross Domestic Product (GDP) estimation for the next 5 years was 3.2% annually (Idaho Statesman 6/00).

 

"The state could receive more than $2 million a year for land it leases to alternative energy companies. A federal study has concluded that Idaho owns 39,500 acres of land with winds that blow hard enough to warrant wind farms. The study says state-owned lands have the potential to produce 660 megawatts, enough juice to power 148,000 homes.

 

"Another $500,000 is going to rural areas to hire regional economic development specialists, who will work with employers interested in moving to their areas."

 

"Growth in Idaho's economy is strong even though agriculture is in a slump.  Cheap hydroelectric power rates are among the lowest in the nation. The relaxed quality of life has attracted national recognition."

 

"Signals are prominent that the family farm in Idaho has shifted to survival mode and that “some producers will be forced to leave production this year,” said Neil Meyer, University of Idaho extension economist who traveled the state last fall for meetings on “Coping with the Current Ag Economy.”

"Factors threatening the farm lifestyle are production at record levels worldwide, declining demand mostly caused by Asian economic problems, excess reserves that drive commodity prices below production costs, and continuing effects of the 1996 Freedom to Farm Act that reduces “market transition payments” over seven years until gone in the year 2003," Neil Meyer, University of Idaho extension. Economist.

"Idaho farmers got more than $262 million in direct government payments last year. The federal government spent more than $600 million on all farm programs during 2001, including the direct payments, research, loans and other programs."

 

"Manufacturing has recently supplanted agriculture as the most important sector of Idaho's economy. Cattle and dairy goods are among the leading agricultural products. Idaho's chief crops are potatoes (for which the state, easily the nation's largest producer, is famous), hay, wheat, peas, beans, and sugar beets. Electronic and computer equipment, processed foods, lumber, and chemicals are the major manufactured items."

 

This geographic reality is evidence by the large number of fortune 500 companies having headquarters or major prescience in Boise!  The area is perfectly suited for new business growth and is attracting new businesses at a rapid rate.

 

"The May 29, 2000 issue of Forbes magazine announced that Idaho ranks fifth on Forbes list of best places in the United States to do business and advance a career."

 

In the year 2000, Idaho was ranked sixth fastest growing state in the U.S. (John Church, Principal, Idaho Economics, at the Boise Metro Chamber’s Economic Outlook Forum 2000).

 

“You can’t transport this quality of life easily,” said Ed Zimmer, chief executive officer at Electronic Controls Co., a Boise firm employing 150. “The major factor behind our growth is the quality of the talent we’ve been able to attract and retain.”

 

“Development in Canyon County is moving east, and Meridian is moving west,” said Patrick Laney." As reported by John Tucker of the Idaho Statesman October 6, 1999.

 

"Shopping in the growing Canyon County continues to get better with a $10 million renovation at Nampa's Karcher Mall, 1509 Caldwell Blvd. The remodeling includes newly redone storefront facades, new flooring and a food court that will bring new stores into the area.  

 

Adjacent to the mall area you'll find new restaurants such as the family favorite Red Robin and a 14-screen Edwards theater megaplex on the west side of the mall. Popular stores at the mall include KB Toy Store, Helen's Gifts & Flowers, Emporium and The Bon Marche” (Ref. 5). http://www.idahostatesman.com/apps/pbcs.dll/section?Category=ENT

 

“Retail vacancy rates in Canyon County remained low in late 2000, at 3.7 percent."  As reported by Commercial Report, Knipe & Knipe.

 

Commercial permits for the first three months of 2000, totaled $3.6 million compared to $8.1 million during the same period a year ago."  As reported by John Tucker of the Idaho Statesman October 10, 1999.

 

"Canyon County projects include the Canyon Park at the Idaho Center, covering 16.5-acres between Franklin Road and the Idaho Center.  Construction of the first two-story, 33,000-square-foot office building was scheduled to start in March 2000 with completion expected mid-2000. 

 

Projected plans consist of four office buildings with 100,000 square feet of space.  Developers having purchased a majority ownership in Sweetwater Holdings LLC (SWH) acquired approval and made agreements between the city of Nampa and SWH.  SWH parent company, Northwest Parks LLC and Nampa had an agreement launched in 1996 – which included construction of a farmers’ market, a movie studio, a hotel and retail shops, which was never realized.  SLB has inked a deal with Premier Alliance, a financial planning services company from down town Nampa, to occupy half of the first building.

 

Other commercial de­velopment has occurred along Nampa-Cald­well Boulevard, the main link between the “twin cities" of Nampa and Caldwell, and along 12th Avenue Road."  As reported by the staff of The Idaho Statesman September 24, 2000.

 

Work commenced in1999 to extend Birch Lane Northwest of the Idaho Center to connect if from Can-Ada Road to Franklin Boulevard. The Franklin Boulevard area, near MCMS Inc., and Micron Electronics, is one of the fastest-growing residential areas in Nampa. Garrity Boulevard exit is a main access to the interstate."   As reported by John Tucker of the Idaho Statesman October 6, 1999. 

 

“MCMS Inc., which manufactures printed circuit-boar assemblies, employs about 1,464 people in its Nampa plant.  It foresees its total employment growing to 1,680 by the end of 2000 based on current market conditions. 

 

Other major players in the local economy include:  Hewlett-Packard Co.; forest-products company Boise Cascade Corp.; agribusiness giant J. R. Simplot Co.; computer manufacture Micron Electronics Inc.; and mobile information management technology provider Extended Systems Inc." As reported by the staff of The Idaho Statesman September 24, 2000.

 

“The Idaho Legislature has earmarked $2 million for Boise State University’s (BSU) Canyon County complex,” spokesman Larry Burke said."   As reported by John Tucker October 9, 1999. 

 

"BSU received $3.5 million from the Legislature during 2000 for the 150-acre campus in Nampa.  Construction began in the spring of 2000 on a $2.6 million student recreation center that will offer state-of-the-art exercise equipment, a climbing wall and fitness classes.  A 642-space parking garage opened in time for the first day of school in the fall of 2000.  The university, founded in 1932 as a junior college, didn’t become a state university until 1974.

 

Northwest Nazarene University in Nampa is continuing to grow and add new programs.  When it changed its name from Northwest Nazarene College to Northwest Nazarene University (NNU) in 1999, the Christian Liberal arts institution restructured and divided into four schools led by deans.  The university has a full-time enrollment of more than 1,300 students.  The essential mission of NNU, which was founded in 1913, is to develop Christian character within the philosophy and frame work of genuine scholarship.” Jennifer Gallagher Oxley of the Idaho Statesman September 24, 2000.

 

“Nampa commercial expansion includes Nampa’s Karcher Mall, 1509 Caldwell Blvd.  The remolding includes newly redone storefront facades that will bring new stores into the area.  The project is estimated at $10 million dollars.  Adjacent to the mall you’ll find new restaurants such as the family favorite Red Robin and a 14-creen Edwards theater complex on the west side of the mall.  Popular stores at the mall include KB Toy Store, Helen’s Gifts & Flowers, Emporium Styling Salon and The Bon Marche."  As reported by Dana Oland of the Idaho Statesman September 24, 2000.

 

Hedrick refocuses, negotiates as public projects dwindle - Storage units provide latest work niche - Idaho Business Review” (Ref. 6).

"Scott Hedrick Construction Inc. located in Boise, is actively involved in Idaho's commercial growth. The Boise-based general contractor has several large public works projects to its credit as well.

Canyon County and McCall projects include:

 

Scott Hedrick Construction Inc. is finishing the new Kuna High School, valued at $12.3 million, to be completed August.  The two-story, 170,000 square-foot high school, situated on 50 acres, includes complete site work such as baseball, football and soccer fields, tennis courts and other amenities.

"We built that project in about 14 months," Hedrick said.

 The firm recently completed the Canyon County Humane Shelter.


Hedrick was the successful bidder for Mercy’s emergency shelter in Nampa, Pridmore said. The $1 million, 9,000 square-foot facility was completed earlier this year.

Hedrick also built a 4,600-square-foot custom home in Kings Pines estates in McCall for Avest. In all, Hedrick has done about $7 million in work for Avest LP, Weber said. Additional storage sites covering hundreds of thousands of square feet are planned, said Weber.

Hedrick also does some high-end residential construction, including a 6,000-square-foot home for Albertson’s CEO Larry Johnston and another 6,000-square-foot home for Rick Belluzzo, president of Microsoft, he said.

 

Among his more unique private-sector projects, Hedrick is working on the McCall Ice Rink and Event Center. The $5.4 million project, funded by the Rich Sabala Foundation, is a 20,000 square-foot building with an 85-foot by 200-foot ice surface. The center includes bleachers and concessions.

"We were involved with that from the day it was conceived," said Hedrick. "We were negotiated in as construction manager and general contractor on that project."

Also in McCall, Hedrick is building an 85-room, $5.7 million Holiday Inn motel and convention center in McCall for Bob Hunt.

 

Hedrick got his background and experience while working with his father, Win, as partners, beginning in 1979. By 1982, Scott had launched his own firm.
"All my experience comes from working with my dad," he said. "He had the real estate company (Hedrick & Bodine Realty), he developed a lot of subdivisions and did some commercial construction."

When father and son partnered, Scott said his goal was to do more commercial work, especially public-works projects.

The firm did about $28 million in sales in 2001, he said, and "it would appear we’ll be pretty close to that again this year."

The firm employs about 45, including four project managers and 10 field superintendents, with the balance comprised of carpenters and other professional construction personnel."  As reported by Ken Levy, Special to the IBR.  Information obtained from an article Published June 17, 2002 in Idaho Construction Review and is not the full report” (Ref. 6).
http://www.idahobusiness.net

CANYON COUNTY CONFLICTS OVER

GROWTH 2000 THROUGH 2002

CHAPTER X - APPENDIX G

 

“Craig Quintana of the Idaho Statesman clearly reports on Canyon County tensions over county growth and struggle to balance planning and property rights dated in his article posted August 8, 2000: 

 

“After three decades, Oscar Wick is finished farming and now wants his 60 acres southeast of Caldwell to produce homes arid cash instead of crops.

 

John Chapman farms his land next to Wick's property and wants to continue as he has for the past 30 years - unfettered by residential neighbors who may find the smells arid sounds of agriculture a nuisance.

 

Their dispute, which is in court, is a small skirmish in a larger political and philosophical battle tearing at Canyon County.

 

The Canyon County Commission in January approved Wick's proposal to subdivide his land acknowledging the owner's right to do as he wishes with his property.

 

The decision reversed a ruling by the Canyon County Planning and Zoning Commission, and prompted Chapman to ask a judge to step in to keep the County from violating its own growth blueprint and planning principles.

 

Disputes over growth --how much, where and under which circumstances – led Canyon County commissioners in August 2000 to fire the majority of its Planning Commission.

 

Four of the seven members -- Norm Alder, Carolyn Harrold, Torn Dorsey and Clinton Pline - were dismissed Aug. 4 after refusing to approve a final development plat. Planning Commissioners Roger Wright, Ed Falkenstein and Jack Atkeson remain. Planning commissioners serve as advisers to and are appointed by the County Commission.

 

The ousters ended an increasingly rocky relationship between the Planning Commission and the County Commission. Wick's was among 24 of 28 development cases appealed within the past 18 months in which the County Commission overruled the planners. Two other appeals are pending, according to County officials. Only four of the Planning Commission's denials were upheld by the County Commission.

 

Upset by six of the reversals, Chapman and five other property owners or groups have gone to court.

 

Those who back the county’s position say the elected officials are properly looking out for individuals like Wick, whose rights are guaranteed by County and state law.

 

Critics say the County Commission is encouraging suburban sprawl, a kind of low-density development that is hard to serve with schools and roads and which consumes valuable agricultural land. Protection of farmland from sprawl also is guaranteed by County and state law, they argue.

 

The situation represents a clash of values in a County that's becoming increasingly less rural and borders the state's largest urban center, Ada County.

 

“Welcome to growing pains,” said David Eberle, president of the Land Trust of the Treasure Valley. “They're a county in conflict.”

 

In years past, Eberle's land-preservation group has held informal discussions with some County officials about strategies for retaining farmland, but the talks never have amounted to any specific proposal.

 

Many expect the dispute over the direction of development in the county to be a factor in November 2000 when County Commissioner Pat Galvin will be up for re-election. Galvin voted with County Commissioner Man Beebe to remove the planning commissioners.  County Commission Chairman Todd Lakey was not present for the vote but later said he approved of the decision.

 

“It's a classic fight, and one that the voters will have to figure out,” Eberle said. “This is what growth is all about. These are tough decisions that a community has to make.”

 

Tensions over growth have escalated in recent years as more cropland is taken out of production and more homes go up.

 

While 84 percent Canyon County remains in agricultural use today, the number of acres in farms, the number of farmers and the number of farm workers have declined steadily in recent years, according to Idaho Department of Commerce statistics.

 

Those declines stand in contrast to big gains in the number of people working in construction and manufacturing over the past 20 years.

 

The philosophical differences between the Planning Commission, which was dominated by a farm-friendly majority until the dismissals, and the County Commission have been laid bare over the past year and a half.

 

Planning commissioners repeatedly rejected proposals to cut farmland into smaller pieces for development - mostly to be overruled by the County Commission on appeal. The elected officials dismissed the planners' objections in 12 of 13 cases last year and in 12 of 15 cases decided this year.

 

Both sides cite the Canyon County Comprehensive Plan, the county’s growth blueprint, and the Idaho Local Planning Act as justification.

 

Agriculture preservationists say the Canyon County Commission is not following its own laws or those of the state by approving “leapfrog” developments, like Wick’s that are disconnected from established urban areas.

 

The county’s growth plan and state law say that development should be concentrated in cities and their “areas of impact,” or future expansion zones required by state law, said Ten Ottens, secretary of the Canyon County Farm Bureau, who also is a planner.

 

“Look what happened in Ada County” Ottens said, “We agree there should be growth, but it should be inside the cities and in the areas of impact.”

When development gets a foothold in ag land, new residents who want a sanitized country atmosphere doom neighboring farms, she said.

 

“There’re near cows, but they don't want the smell,” Ottens said. They don't want the aerial sprayer coming over at 6 a.m. on a Sunday morning.

 

County commissioners and their supporters say they are tying to protect individual’s right to do what they want with their land, a core Idaho value. It's difficult to reconcile that right with the strong desire to preserve the county’s agricultural heritage, Beebe said.

 

“Like it or not, growth is inevitable, Beebe said.”  As always, the goal of the County is to protect the prime agricultural land whenever possible.

 

In recent years, the county’s attempt to forge a middle ground has taken shape in the “ag harmony” proposal. The concept was to allow development of marginal farm ground, while keeping the best soil in production through a complex set of land-use policies.

 

But the committee working on the proposal eventually was fragmented by the ag-vs. - development split, and the proposal was shelved earlier this year when it came before the Planning and Zoning Commission.

 

The lack of ag harmony guidelines has left the Planning Commission and County Commission to sort out the issues on a largely case-by-case basis.  Mostly, they have disagreed.  In evaluating the disputed developments, planning commissioners generally have objected to a lack of adequate roads, schools, and police and fire services or the folly or building homes in the middle of farms.

 

Several parts of the Canyon County Comprehensive Plan require the county to keep development close to cities, to locate homes where they are easiest to serve and to save the best farmland from development.

 

The philosophy the Planning Commission used to evaluate, and ultimately reject, the developments was spelled out in the county’s original growth plan, written in 1975 and updated 20 years later, said Norm Alder, a Melba farmer and one of the four ousted planning commissioners.  “In 1975, they set the ground rules, and now everyone wants to change them,” he said.  “It's sad, I guess.  It'd be so easy if they'd follow the comp plan.”

 

The issue is more than philosophical for Alder and his wife, Kathy. They've joined others in asking a judge to review the county’s approval of a subdivision near their south Canyon County farm.

 

“By the time everybody gets their subdivisions done we’ll be squeezed out,” said Kathy Alder, a member of Idaho Agri-Women, an advocacy group. “They see property rights as the right of the person who wants to subdivide.  That's not considering the property rights of the person down the street."

 

The Alders say growth needs to occur near the cities, which have expansion zones expected to accept development.  “We weren't trying to be ugly,” she said.  “We weren’t trying to stop growth.  We want it to he managed.  Instead of the normal spread from the cities out, they're putting it out in the county.”

 

It's a philosophical as well as an emotional issue for the Alders.  Several years ago, they were offered $10,000 an acre for some of their land near Melba.  They rejected the offer, despite the potential for big profit.  “I’m just a dumb farmer, I guess,” Norm Alder said.  “Personally, I don't see that as a wise thing to do for society.”  Their view is diametrically opposed to that of county officials and their supporters, who view the former Planning Commission majority as militantly pro-ag and anti-growth.

 

As long as they own the land, they can make all the anti-growth decisions they want, said Galvin, the county commissioner most critical of the ousted planning commissioners.

 

But people who no longer want to farm should not be forced into it, said Galvin, a staunch supporter of private-property rights.  “I think that's taking away from some people's rights,” she said.  “A lot of the people who are complaining about subdividing are not considering private-property rights.  And that's exactly what the Planning Commission was doing, Galvin said.

 

Many of the cases feeding the friction between the County Commission and the Planning Commission involved attorney Susan Wildwood, a Boise attorney who represents Wick and many others.

 

Wildwood said she is sensitive not to take cases unless there is a compelling reason to pull the land out of production, such as encroaching development or financial hardship. That accounts for her success before the County Commission, not the Planning Commission, she said.

 

“The cases that I've been involved with have consistently been overturned” by the County Commission, she said.  Fear of losing ag land amid the ongoing population boom motivated the planning commissioners to take unreasonable stances, she said.

 

On the Wick case, Wildwood said, they denied her client the right to have 38 homes on his 60 acres when pre-existing zoning approvals would have allowed him to have 19 residential lots.  If the land was going to be convened from ag land to residential in any event, it made no sense to subdivide for such a low number of homes, Wildwood said.

 

While the county's growth plan and the state planning act encourage farmland protection and the concentration of development around urban areas, they clearly indicate property rights come first, Wildwood said. 

 

Under the terms of the Local Land Use Planning Act, protection of private-property rights is listed alongside protection of prime agricultural land and encouragement of urban development around cities.

 

The law is a general statement, meant to allow local officials to sort out which value comes first, said Jim Weatherby, a Boise State University professor of public policy and administration.

 

“As originally drafted the local planning act respected the right of local authorities to make many of these decisions,” Weatherby said.

 

 

“This is one of the major philosophical conflicts between the right of individuals to develop their own property and the community interest in maintaining compact development and avoiding sprawl.”

 

Ultimately, the courts often are called upon to decide who's right, Weatherby said.  Despite the development ideals of planners and the comprehensive plan, the fact is many people want to live in the country, Wildwood said.  “They don't want to be in a city; they want to have horses,” she said.

 

Some planning advocates and other local officials agree with much of what critics such as the Alders say.  The county government appears to be putting property rights above good planning and efficient government, said Jon Barrett, a coordinator with Idaho Smart Growth, a planning advocacy group.

 

“The property rights appear to be defined differently there,” he said, “It's more like, I can do anything.”  Canyon’s continuing struggle to provide adequate schools, roads, sewers and emergency services makes the far-flung development costly, Barrett said.  Soon, County and regional governments such as road and school districts will be far behind, he predicted.

 

That may already be happening to some extent in the Vallivue School District, whose 1,679 student-enrollment puts it beyond capacity.  In response to recent subdivisions, the district has informed the county that it can’t handle additional students.   The district is preparing a $10.35 million bond issue proposal for a Sept. 7, 2000 special election to build a new elementary school and remodel the east and west Canyon elementaries.

 

“We're over capacity in every one of those schools,” said Vaughn Heinrich, School District superintendent.  “We've got to be able to handle the growth,” he said.  If they develop too many (homes) at one time, it really has a negative impact.  But Heinrich also is sympathetic to farmers who want to develop their land because of changing economics, and the county officials who must consider their requests.  “It does affect us, but, on the other hand, there is a choice, and it is private ownership," he said. 

 

Melba Mayor Hal Forsgren is interested in development that could be occurring nearer his town and supporting his tax-base. “Why go to the trouble to have impact areas when they let developers develop out in the middle of nowhere?”  He asked.  His town, with about 200 residents, is contemplating a $100,000 upgrade to its wastewater treatment plant and may establish a special tax district to fix its streets.

 

Many of the anti-growth arguments make sense to Wick, who maintains a soft spot for agriculture despite his attempt to develop his 60 acres.  Wick has farmed his land since 1970, growing sugar beets, wheat and other crops.  At 59 he is moving into retirement and his development is supposed to supply his nest egg.  A farmer a heart, he said his head says he must take advantage of his opportunity. 

 

“You can't raise corn at the same price as you can raise houses,” he said.  Wick said he has taken a number of steps to make his development farm-friendly, including extra-wide setbacks to allow nearby field spraying.  But it's not enough for Chapman, who fears the beginning of residential building will signal the end of his farming days.

 

 

When residential development moves into ag country, a chain reaction is set off, said William Morrow, Chapman's attorney.  Homeowners will begin to complain about the smells and sounds from the farms, and the area's property values increase, providing further incentive for the farmers to move on, he said.

 

“If Wick gets his subdivision, he'll change the character of that property,” Morrow said. “Probably, the surrounding landowners will do similar things, and my guy, who's a fanner, will have to find other land to farm.”

 

From atop a hill north of Melba, the view is of farms covering the countryside to the west.  Canyon County planners and agriculture interests are split on how best to preserve the county’s farmland and how to balance the interests of property owners who want to use their land in different ways.

 

Norm and Kathy Alder intend to hold on to their 900-acre farm near Melba and grow seed corn, alfalfa, potatoes and other crops on 900 acres near Melba." Craig Quintana of the Idaho Statesman, August 8, 2000:

 

LAND DEVELOPMENT SPECIALIST AND HOMEBUILDERS OF IDAHO

CHAPTER X - APPENDIX H

 

Builder Directory http://www.builderdirectory.com

 

BUILDERS Who Build with Rumford Fireplaces

http://www.rumford.com/builder.html

 

Home Remodeling Companies in Idaho: Contractors for Kitchen, Bathroom, Roofing, Siding, Fence, Deck, Patio, Landscaping, Sunroom, Basement http://www.us-home-remodeling.com/idaho

 

Idaho General Contractors Pacific Northwest Directory

http://www.nwbuildnet.com

 

Idaho Home Builders - American Builders Network, Inc. http://www.americanbuilders.com/ID

 

Idaho DOE Status of State Energy Codes http://www.energycodes.gov

 

 Ormond Builders, Inc. - "Is one of the largest building contractors in the Intermountain West.  Specializing in the construction of commercial, public, industrial, and specialized buildings, we have a long list of successful projects.  We are proud of the relationships that we have built with our clients and feel that their recommendations are the best measure of our success."

http://www.ormondbuilders.com

 

O'Neill Enterprises, Inc. - McCall, Boise, Sun Valley, Idaho

http://www.newhomeweb.com/Communities/States/communities_id.htm

 

North Idaho Building Contractors Association, Inc. http://www.nibca.com

 

CSHQA architectural and Engineering Firm located in Boise, Sacramento, Los Angels and Portland http://www.cshqa.com

 

Rosewood Builders, Inc., P.O. Box 51535, Idaho Falls, ID 83405 US
http://www.rosewooddevelopment.com/commercial.html

 

Skyline Corporation - "Was founded in Boise, Idaho in 1967 as a land development company.  It has become the largest residential Development Company in Idaho, having developed over 3,900 home sites in Idaho.  President EDWARD A. JOHNSON and his sons are actively involed in Ada County Land Development.  Address:  5330 Farrow Street, Boise, Idaho 83704.  Business. No. 208-377-4104. 

 

State of Idaho Board of Professional Engineers and Professional Land Surveyors http://www.state.id.us/ipels

 

Toothman-Orton Engineering Company, Boise Idaho

http://www.toengrco.com/site_map.html

 

Tomlinson Black North Idaho http://www.tb.com/index.asp

 

 

BOISE AND MERIDIAN DISTRICTS AND ADA COUNTY SELECTED

CITIES OVERVIEW AND AVERAGE/MEDIAN HOME SALES

FROM JANUARY 1998 THROUGH April 2005 BY AREA

CHAPTER X - APPENDIX I Area 100 to 200

 

 

North & North End Boise (Area 100)

 

 

Downtown Boise Association http://www.downtown.neighborhood.com

 

Downtown Boise Map provided by the City of Boise http://www.cityofboise.org/pds/Neighborhood/Maps/downtown.gif

 

North Boise Map provided by the Intermountain Multiple Listing Services, Inc (IMLS)

http://www.intermountainmls.com/images/adamap5.gif

North End Neighborhood Association, Inc. http://www.northend.org and or http://www.nena.neighborhood.com

 

North End Boise Map provided by the City of Boise http://www.cityofboise.org/pds/Neighborhood/Maps/North%20End.gif 

 

City of Boise Home Page http://www.cityofboise.org

 

Idaho Commerce & Labor http://www.idoc.state.id.us

 

“North Boise also encompasses the dynamic downtown area, which is a weekend hot spot with dozens of restaurants, bars, clubs and theaters.  Already home to numerous fine restaurants, lively nightclubs and one-of-a-kind shops and businesses, it seems more are springing up al­most daily.  The luxurious Grove Hotel on Capitol Boule­vard features a sculpture of the Boise River.

 

Along with the gorgeous rooms and ameni­ties, the hotel also is home to the Idaho Steel-heads, a minor league hockey club.

 

If Hyde Park is the heart of the North End, the downtown certainly is the soul.  And there is probably no better place to renew the soul than Julia Davis Park.  Situated along the Boise River, Julia Davis Park is home to Zoo Boise, the Historical Museum, the Art Museum and a number of events including concerts, arts and crafts shows and festivals." As reported by staff of the Idaho Statesman September 24, 2000.

 

“Nestled between the Foothills and down town, the historic North End is one of Boise's signature neighborhoods.  Sidewalk cafes and antique shops mixed with stunning Victorians, Queen Ann-style homes and small bungalows make the North End attractive.  Its close proximity to down town also makes the North End a desirable place to live.

 

Residents and visitors enjoy a variety of of­ferings at the eateries in Hyde Park.  And Camel's Back Park, which just received a new playground this summer, is a main drawing card of North Boise.  The heart of the North End is Hyde Park an area of shops and restaurants that feels like a separate village within the city.  Long an area where home renters and homeowners were split nearly half and half, that has changed over the past few years.  Many homes built in the late 1800s and after the turn of the century are being purchased and refurbished by young families.  Property values and housing prices are increasing every year.

 

The finest example of this resurgence is stately Harrison Boulevard, a showplace of Boise's storied past.  Large homes lookout over the broad avenue.  Trees line both sides of the street as well as the wide median the middle.  Residents of Harrison Boulevard are known throughout Boise for their lavish holiday decorating, particularly on Halloween.

 

However, North Enders are alarmed by increasing traffic, which they say threatens the future of their neighborhood.  New proposed housing development in the Foothills including Somerset Ridge Phase II will generate more traffic, maxing out North End streets such as 15th Street, Harrison Boulevard and Hill Road.  The North End Neighborhood Association, one of the most vocal groups in City Hall, is or-gnarling a legal defense fund to pay for legal challenges to development decisions."  As reported by staff of the Idaho Statesman September 24, 2000.

 

It is a popular area for families in the higher income brackets.  Almost 50 percent of North End residents have kids below the age of 18.  The Boise School District serves this area."  As reported by staff of the Idaho Statesman September 24, 2000.

 

Boise School District, Idaho’s largest School District had 26,700 students enrolled in 2000." As reported by Bill Roberts staff of the Idaho Statesman September 24, 2000.

 

"The Treasure Valley also is the home of the nation's second largest grocery chain, Albertson 's Inc.  The Boise-based Company opened Idaho’s first Sav-on drugstore in Boise's North End in June 2000.  In the previous year, Albertson's merged with American Stores Co., which was Sav-on's parent company." As reported by staff of the Idaho Statesman September 24, 2000.

 

Only 18 of the 392 North End homes sold in 1999 were new con­struction, According to the Ada County Associ­ation of Realtors.  86 sold by the end of December 2000 of which 1 was new construction.  By the end of December 2001, 96 homes sold of which 4 was new construction.

 

Ada County Residential Home Sales statistics provided by the Intermountain Multiple Listing Services, Inc (IMLS) http://www.intermountainmls.com/rstats/AdaInterface.html 

 

1998

 

“North Boise refereed to, as Area 100, average price of a home sold by December 1998 was $155,189 as compared to the Median price of $129,900” (Ref. 1).

 

QUARTER/YEAR

NEW CONST

EXISTING HOMES

TOTAL LISTING

1st/1998

2

63

65(Ref. 2)

2nd/1998

4

170

174 (Ref. 1B)

3rd/1998

8

280

288(Ref. 1C)

4th/1998

106

255

361(Ref. 1)

TOTAL

120

768

888

 

“Ada County average price of a home sold was $140,728 at the end of December 1998, as compared to the median price of $119,900 county wide” (Ref. 1).

 

1999

 

“The average price of a North Boise home sold by December 1999 was $161,032, as compared to the Median price of $129,700” (Ref. 3).

 

QUARTER/YEAR

NEW CONST

EXISTING HOMES

TOTAL LISTING

1st/1999

7

74

81 (Ref. 4)

2nd/1999

13

176

189 (Ref. 5)

3rd/1999

15

300

315 (Ref. 6)

4th/1999

18

374

392 (Ref. 3).

TOTAL

53

924

977

 

“Ada County average of the price of a home sold was $147,829 at the end of December 1999, as compared to the median price of $123,500 county wide” (Ref. 3).

 

2000

 

“The average price of homes sold during the first three months of 2000 in Area 100, was $177,517, as compared to the Median price of $155,000” (Ref. 7).

 

QUARTER/YEAR

NEW CONST

EXISTING HOMES

TOTAL LISTING

1st/2000

0

85

85(Ref. 7)

2nd/2000

1

115

116(Ref. 8)

3rd/2000

2

115

117(Ref. 9)

4th/2000

1

85

86(Ref. 10)

TOTAL

4

400

404

 

“Ada County average price of homes sold at the end of the first three months of 2000 was $151,591 as compared to the median price of $123,500” (Ref. 7).

 

2001

 

“The average price of homes sold during the first three months of 2001 in Area 100, was $ $179,399, as compared to the Median price of $130,000” (Ref. 11)

 

QUARTER/YEAR

NEW CONST

EXISTING HOMES

TOTAL LISTING

1st/2001

3

74

77 (Ref. 11)

2nd/2001

3

113

116 (Ref. 12)

3rd/2001

4

104

108 (Ref. 13)

4th/2001

4

92

96 (Ref. 14

TOTAL

14

383

397

 

“Ada County average price of homes sold at the end of the first three months of 2001 was $158,827, as compared to the median price of $131,000” (Ref. 11).

 

2002

 

“At the end of the First Quarter of 2002, the average price of homes sold in North Boise (Area 100) was $187,257, as compared to the Median price of $159,000. Ada County average price of homes sold at the end of the first three months of 2002 was $166,999, as compared to the median price of $139,000” (Ref. 15).

 

QUARTER/YEAR

NEW CONST

EXISTING HOMES

TOTAL LISTING

1st/2002

5

74

79 (Ref. 15)

2nd/2002

8

123

131 (Ref. 16)

3rd/2002

3

117

120 (Ref. 17)

4th/2002

5

95

100 (Ref. 18)

TOTAL

21

409

430

 

“At the end of the Second Quarter of 2002, the average price of homes sold in North Boise (Area 100) was $184,956, as compared to the Median price of $156,900. Ada County average price of homes sold at the end of the Second Quarter or June 2002 was $172,188, as compared to the median price of $140,000” (Ref. 16).

 

“At the end of the Third Quarter of 2002, the average price of homes sold in North Boise (Area 100) was $213,850, as compared to the Median price of $160,000. Ada County average price of homes sold at the end of the Third Quarter or September 2002 was $173,920, as compared to the median price of $143,545” (Ref. 17).

 

“At the end of the Fourth Quarter of 2002, the average price of homes sold in North Boise (Area 100) was $188,776, as compared to the Median price of $163,625. Ada County average price of homes sold at the end of the Fourth Quarter 2002 was $167,911, as compared to the median price of $142,025” (Ref. 18).

 

January 1998 through December 2002 North Boise (Area 100) Single-Family Homes Sold:

 

QUARTER/YEAR

NEW CONST

EXISTING HOMES

TOTAL LISTING

1st - 4th / 1998

120

768

888

1st - 4th / 1999

53

924

977

1st - 4th / 2000

4

400

404

1st - 4th / 2001

14

383

397

1st - 4th / 2002

21

409

430

TOTAL

212

2,884

3,096

 

January 1998 through December 2002 North Boise (Area 100) Single-Family Homes Sold consists of the following monthly average by decimal:

 

NEW CONST

EXISTING HOMES

TOTAL LISTING

3.53

48.06

51.6

 

2003

 

“At the end of the First Quarter of 2003, the average price of homes sold in North Boise (Area 100) was $170,264, as compared to the Median price of $143,400. Ada County average price of homes sold at the end of the first three months of 2003 was $164,136, as compared to the median price of $139,800” (Ref. 19).

 

QUARTER/YEAR

NEW CONST

EXISTING HOMES

TOTAL LISTING

1st/2003

3

72

73 (Ref. 19)

2nd/2003

9

110

119 (Ref. 20)

3rd/2003

8

127

135(Ref. 21)

4th/2003

12

83

95 (Ref. 22)

TOTAL

32

392

422

 

“At the end of the Second Quarter of 2003, the average price of homes sold in North Boise (Area 100) was $219,314, as compared to the Median price of $175,600

 

Ada County average price of homes sold at the end of the Second Quarter or June 2003 was $164,136, as compared to the median price of $139,800” (Ref. 20).

 

“At the end of the Third Quarter of 2003, the average price of homes sold in North Boise (Area 100) was $207,955, as compared to the Median price of $185,000. Ada County average price of homes sold at the end of the Third Quarter or September 2003 was $178,882, as compared to the median price of $150,000” (Ref. 21).

 

“At the end of the Fourth Quarter of 2003, the average price of homes sold in North Boise (Area 100) was $224,101, as compared to the Median price of $172,000. Ada County average price of homes sold at the end of the Fourth Quarter 2003 was $185,995, as compared to the median price of $155,900” (Ref. 22).

 

First through Fourth Quarter of 2003 Monthly Average total # Single-Family Homes Sold in North Boise (Area 100) by decimal:

 

Ada County

NEW CONST

EXISTING HOMES

TOTAL LISTING

1st to 4th Qtr

2.66

32.66

35.16

 

2004

 

“At the end of the First Quarter of 2004, the average price of homes sold in North Boise (Area 100) was $195,046, as compared to the Median price of $162,000. Ada County average price of homes sold at the end of the first three months of 2004 was $179,925, as compared to the median price of $160,000” (Ref. 23).

 

QUARTER/YEAR

NEW CONST

EXISTING HOMES

TOTAL LISTING

1st Qtr 2004

6

77

83 (Ref. 23)

2nd Qtr 2004

17

140

157 (Ref. 24)

Year End Report 3rd Qtr total listing = difference of 1st, 2nd & 4th Qtr total listing

Not reported

Not reported

486-359=127 (Ref. 25)

4th Qtr 2004

17

102

119 (Ref. 26)

TOTAL

40

319

486

Jan to June = 1st & 2nd Qtr & Sep to Dec = 4th Qtr 2004

 

“At the end of the Second Quarter of 2004, the average price of homes sold in North Boise (Area 100) was $225,394, as compared to the Median price of $185,000.  Ada County average price of homes sold at the end of the Second Quarter or June 2004 was $191,157, as compared to the median price of $160,000” (Ref. 24).

 

“At the end of the Third Quarter of 2004, the average price of homes sold in Northeast Boise (Area 200) was _____, as compared to the Median price of _____. Ada County average price of homes sold at the end of the Third Quarter or September 2004 was _____, as compared to the median price of _____” (Ref. 25).

 

“At the end of the Fourth Quarter of 2004, the average price of homes sold in Northeast Boise (Area 200) was $244,128, as compared to the Median price of $182,500. Ada County average price of homes sold at the end of the Fourth Quarter 2004 was $203,190, as compared to the median price of $170,000” (Ref. 26).

 

First through Fourth Quarters of December 2004 Monthly Average total # Single-Family Homes Sold in North Boise (Area 100) by decimal:

 

Ada County

NEW CONST

EXISTING HOMES

TOTAL LISTING

1st, 2nd & 4th 2004

4.44

35.44

40.5

Jan to June = 1st & 2nd Qtr & Sep to Dec = 4th Qtr 2004

New Construction and Existing Homes = 9-months and total listing = 12-months

 

January 1998 through December 2004 total # Single-Family Homes Sold in North Boise (Area 100):

 

Ada County

NEW CONST

EXISTING HOMES

TOTAL LISTING

1998

120

768

888

1999

53

924

977

2000

4

400

404

2001

14

383

397

2002

21

409

430

2003

32

392

422

1st, 2nd & 4th 2004

40

319

359

Year End Report 3rd Qtr total listing = difference of 1st, 2nd & 4th Qtr total listing

Not reported

Not reported

486-359=127

TOTAL

284

3,595

4,004

Jan to June = 1st & 2nd Qtr & Sep to Dec = 4th Qtr 2004

New Construction and Exiting Homes total reflects 1998 to 1st, 2nd & 3rd 2004 = 81-months and total listing = 84-months

 

January 1998 through December 2004 Monthly Average total # Single-Family Homes Sold in North Boise (Area 100) by decimal:

 

Ada County

NEW CONST

EXISTING HOMES

TOTAL LISTING

1998 to 2004

3.50

44.38

47.66

Jan to June = 1st & 2nd Qtr & Sep to Dec = 4th Qtr 2004

New Construction and Exiting Homes total reflects 1998 to 1st, 2nd & 3rd 2004 = 81-months and total listing = 84-months

Year End Report 3rd Qtr total listing = difference of 1st, 2nd & 4th Qtr total listing

 

2005

 

“At the end of the First Quarter of 2005, the average price of homes sold in North Boise (Area 100) was $250,979, as compared to the Median price of $208,400. Ada County average price of homes sold at the end of the first three months of 2005 was $204,644, as compared to the median price of $173,500” (Ref. 27)

 

QUARTER/YEAR

NEW CONST

EXISTING HOMES

TOTAL LISTING

1st/2005

Not Reported

Not Reported

89 (Ref. 27)

04/05

Not Reported

Not Reported

48 (Ref. 28)

TOTAL

 

 

137

Total listing = 4-months

 

“During April 2005 the average price of homes sold in North Boise (Area 100) was $242,159, as compared to the Median price of $205,000. Ada County average price of homes sold at the end of the first three months of 2005 was $204,644, as compared to the median price of $176, ” (Ref. 28)

 

January though April 2005 Monthly Average total # Single-Family Homes Sold in North Boise (Area 100) by decimal:

 

Ada County

NEW CONST

EXISTING HOMES

TOTAL LISTING

Jan to Apr 2005

 

 

34.25

Total listing = 4-months

 

January 1998 through April 2005 total # Single-Family Homes Sold in North Boise (Area 100):

 

Ada County

NEW CONST

EXISTING HOMES

TOTAL LISTING

1998

120

768

888

1999

53

924

977

2000

4

400

404

2001

14

383

397

2002

21

409

430

2003

32

392

422

1st, 2nd & 4th 2004

40

319

359

Year End Report 3rd Qtr total listing = difference of 1st, 2nd & 4th Qtr total listing

Not reported

Not reported

486-359=127

1st Qtr /2005

Not Reported

Not Reported

89

04/05

Not Reported

Not Reported

48

TOTAL

284

3,595

4,141

Jan to June = 1st & 2nd Qtr & Sep to Dec = 4th Qtr 2004

New Construction and Exiting Homes total reflects 1998 to 1st, 2nd & 3rd 2004 to March 2005 = 84-months and total listing = 88-months

New Construction and Exiting Homes Jan to April 2005 not available

 

January 1998 through April 2005 Monthly Average total # Single-Family Homes Sold in North Boise (Area 100) by decimal:

 

Ada County

NEW CONST

EXISTING HOMES

TOTAL LISTING

1998 to April 2005

3.50

44.38

47.05

Jan to June = 1st & 2nd Qtr & Sep to Dec = 4th Qtr 2004

New Construction and Exiting Homes total reflects 1998 to 1st, 2nd & 3rd 2004 = 81-months and total listing = 88-months

Year End Report 3rd Qtr total listing = difference of 1st, 2nd & 4th Qtr total listing

New Construction and Exiting Homes Jan to April 2005 not available

*January 1998 through April 2005

 

Ada County Residential Home Sales statistics provided by the Intermountain Multiple Listing Services, Inc (IMLS)

http://www.intermountainmls.com/rstats/AdaInterface.html 

 

(Ref. 1) http://www.intermountainmls.com/rstats/AdaQtr4.htm

(Ref. 1B) http://www.intermountainmls.com/statistics.html

(Ref. 1C) http://www.intermountainmls.com/statistics.html

(Ref. 2) http://www.intermountainmls.com/rstats/AdaQtr1.htm

(Ref. 3) http://www.intermountainmls.com/rstats/Ada4Q99.htm

(Ref. 4) http://www.intermountainmls.com/rstats/Ada1Q99.htm 

(Ref. 5) http://www.intermountainmls.com/rstats/Ada2Q99.htm 

(Ref. 6) http://www.intermountainmls.com/rstats/Ada3Q99.htm

(Ref. 7) http://www.intermountainmls.com/rstats/Ada1Q00.htm 

(Ref. 8) http://www.intermountainmls.com/rstats/Ada2Q.htm 

(Ref. 9) http://www.intermountainmls.com/rstats/AdaQ3.html 

(Ref. 10) http://www.intermountainmls.com/rstats/ada4q00.html 

(Ref. 11) http://www.intermountainmls.com/rstats/Ada1Q01.html 

(Ref. 12) http://www.intermountainmls.com/rstats/Ada2Q01.pdf 

(Ref. 13) http://www.intermountainmls.com/rstats/Ada3Q01.pdf 

(Ref. 14) http://www.intermountainmls.com/rstats/Ada4Q01.pdf 

(Ref. 15) http://www.intermountainmls.com/rstats/Ada1Q02.pdf

(Ref. 16) http://www.intermountainmls.com/rstats/Ada2Q02.pdf

(Ref. 17) http://www.intermountainmls.com/rstats/Ada3Q02.pdf

(Ref. 18 to 28) http://www.intermountainmls.com/statistics.html

 

 

Northeast and East End Boise (Area 200)

 

Northeast Map provided by the Intermountain Multiple Listing Services, Inc (IMLS)

http://www.intermountainmls.com/images/adamap6.gif

 

Downtown Boise Association http://www.downtown.neighborhood.com

 

Downtown Boise Map provided by the City of Boise http://www.cityofboise.org/pds/Neighborhood/Maps/downtown.gif

 

City of Boise Home Page http://www.cityofboise.org

 

Idaho Commerce & Labor http://www.idoc.state.id.us

 

"Northeast Boise also gives instant meaning to Boise's title of City of Trees.  Beautiful trees not only grow along the river, but also spread throughout the neighborhood.  They are nowhere more evident than in beautiful Municipal Park, a riverside playground with popular covered picnic shelters. The park hosts company picnics for many of Boise's biggest and most successful corpora­tions and family get togethers of all sizes. 

 

And added attraction is the adjacent MK Na­ture Center, an educational park celebrating the beauty of Idaho.  And Warm Springs Avenue serves as a ma­jor route to the fishing, boating and water-ski­ing on nearby Lucky Peak Reservoir.  The Boise School District serves Northeast Boise. As might be expected in an older neigh­borhood, many of the schools are in older buildings.  Academic achievement in these schools remains high.

 

As also might be expected in an older neigh­borhood, retail centers are at a minimum. Northeast Boise has two small retail areas at either end of the traditional residential section of Warm Springs Avenue.  It also includes the northeastern section of downtown Boise.

 

Boise School District, Idaho’s largest School District had 26,700 students enrolled in 2000." As reported by Bill Roberts staff of the Idaho Statesman September 24, 2000.

 

The popularity of Northeast Boise is reflect­ed in the housing prices."  As reported by staff of the Idaho Statesman September 24 2000.

 

East End Boise

 

East End Neighborhood Association http://www.frbna.neighborhood.com

 

East End Map provided by the City of Boise http://www.cityofboise.org/pds/Neighborhood/Maps/East%20End.gif

 

“The East End of Boise is the only neighborhood in Boise that can boast a 100 year old historic district, direct access to the Foothills, the Greenbelt and the Boise River.  These three characteristics have made the East End an attractive spot for homebuyers and outdoors enthusiasts.  Residents can easily access the Foothills and Table Rock from Quarry View Park on the eastern edge of the neighborhood.  A new foot­bridge spanning the Boise River has improved neighborhood access to the Greenbelt.  And the neighborhood's celebrated Warm Springs Av­enue Historic District is easily the ambassador of the East End.  The elegant homes, many or­namented with sandstone from the famous Table Rock quarry, reflect the traditional neighborhood's character and history.

 

The East End Neighborhood Association is also one of the most active and professional or­ganizations in the city. East Enders were one of the first neighborhoods in the city to complete a neighborhood plan, which becomes a layer of the city's comprehensive plan and repre­sents a consensus for the future vision of the area.

 

East End leadership often appears before the City Council and the Planning and Zoning Commission to defend the historic neighbor­hood from adjacent development, including Harris Ranch and Boulder Heights Estates that generate cut through traffic.

 

Existing East End neighborhoods include older homes built along a grid of narrow, quiet streets tucked away between Warm Springs Avenue and the Foothills.  They meander up in-to the Foothills along labyrinthine roadways serving newer hillside developments.

 

Homebuyers will find everything from the historic South Boise Village along Boise Av­enue - the former path of the Oregon Trail -to Columbia Village, a modem 1,400-home neighborhood at the eastern edge of the city.

 

At its far northwest tip is Boise State Univer­sity's riverside campus and the no-nonsense houses and apartment buildings in the univer­sity district.  From there, it spreads out in a fan shape, tak­ing in a variety of neighborhoods and retail centers.

 

Near the university is Park Center Boule­vard.  Clean and green, Park Center Boulevard is lined not only with flowering trees but also with the corporate headquarters of one of Boise's biggest corporations, Albertson's Inc.  Before it ends, Park Center Boulevard winds along the edge of exclusive riverside develop­ments, including River Run that many corpo­rate executives call home.

 

These developments have immediate ac­cess to the Boise River Greenbelt, the walking and biking path that winds along the river through habitat rich with eagles and other wildlife.  The Greenbelt, the city's pride and joy, also connects with Barber Park, operated by Ada County as the “jumping off” point for residents tubing or rafting the Boise River during the summer. 

 

Ada County Residential Home Sales statistics provided by the Intermountain Multiple Listing Services, Inc (IMLS) http://www.intermountainmls.com/rstats/AdaInterface.html 

 

1998

 

“Northeast Boise refereed to, as Area 200, average price of a home sold by December 1998 was $172,629, as compared to the Median price of $149,000” (Ref. 1).

 

QUARTER/YEAR

NEW CONST

EXISTING HOMES

TOTAL LISTING

1st/1998

1

18

19 (Ref. 2)

2nd/1998

7

79

 86 (Ref. 1B)

3rd/1998

6

53

 59 (Ref. 1C)

4th/1998

32

89

121 (Ref. 1)

TOTAL

46

239

284

 

“Ada County average price of a home sold was $140,728 at the end of December 1998, as compared to the median price of $119,900 county wide. (Ref. 1)

 

1999

 

“The average price of a Northeast Boise home sold by December 1999 was $210,434, as compared to the Median price of $177,500” (Ref. 3)..

 

QUARTER/YEAR

NEW CONST

EXISTING HOMES

TOTAL LISTING

1st/1999

4

17

21 (Ref. 4)

2nd/1999

7

51

58 (Ref. 5)

3rd/1999

13

77

90 (Ref. 6)

4th/1999

17

102

119 (Ref. 3)

TOTAL

41

247

288

 

“Ada County average of the price of a home sold was $147,829 at the end of December 1999, as compared to the median price of $123,500 county wide. About 20 of the 119 homes sold in Northeast Boise in 1999 were new construction” (Ref. 3).

 

2000

 

“The average price of homes sold during the first three months of 2000 in Area 200, was $206,257, as compared to the Median price of $180,450” (Ref. 7).

 

QUARTER/YEAR

NEW CONST

EXISTING HOMES

TOTAL LISTING

1st/2000

3

17

20 (Ref. 7)

2nd/2000

11

37

48 (Ref. 8)

3rd/2000

22

28

50 (Ref. 9)

4th/2000

18

27

45 (Ref. 10)

TOTAL

54

109

163

 

“Ada County average of the price of a home sold was $151,591 at the end of March 2000, as compared to the median price of $123,500 county wide” (Ref. 7).

 

2001

 

“At the end of the First Quarter of 2001, the average price of homes sold in West Northeast Boise was $215,052, as compared to the Median price of $209,857” (Ref. 11).

 

QUARTER/YEAR

NEW CONST

EXISTING HOMES

TOTAL LISTING

1st/2001

10

24

34 (Ref. 11)

2nd/2001

29

33

62 (Ref. 12)

3rd/2001

39

22

61 (Ref. 13)

4th/2001

37

45

82 (Ref. 14)

TOTAL

115

124

239

 

“Ada County average price of homes sold at the end of the first three months of 2001 was $158,827, as compared to the median price of $131,000” (Ref. 11).

 

2002

 

“At the end of the First Quarter of 2002, the average price of homes sold in Northeast Boise (Area 200) was $238,925, as compared to the Median price of $215,000. Ada County average price of homes sold at the end of the first three months of 2002 was $166,999, as compared to the median price of $139,000” (Ref. 15).

 

QUARTER/YEAR

NEW CONST

EXISTING HOMES

TOTAL LISTING

1st/2002

13

26

39 (Ref. 15)

2nd/2002

35

42

77 (Ref. 16)

3rd/2002

33

33

66 (Ref. 17)

4th/2002

26

25

51 (Ref. 18)

TOTAL

107

126

233

 

“At the end of the Second Quarter of 2002, the average price of homes sold in Northeast Boise (Area 200) was $244,674, as compared to the Median price of $223,000. Ada County average price of homes sold at the end of the Second Quarter or June 2002 was $172,188, as compared to the median price of $140,000” (Ref. 16).

 

“At the end of the Third Quarter of 2002, the average price of homes sold in Northeast Boise (Area 200) was $302,205, as compared to the Median price of $250,000. Ada County average price of homes sold at the end of the Third Quarter or September 2002 was $173,920, as compared to the median price of $143,545” (Ref. 17).

 

“At the end of the Fourth Quarter of 2002, the average price of homes sold in Northeast Boise (Area 200) was $235,000, as compared to the Median price of $258,381. Ada County average price of homes sold at the end of the Fourth Quarter 2002 was $167,911, as compared to the median price of $142,025” (Ref. 18).

 

January 1998 through December 2002 Northeast Boise (Area 200) Single-Family Homes Sold:

 

QUARTER/YEAR

NEW CONST

EXISTING HOMES

TOTAL LISTING

1st - 4th / 1998

46

239

284

1st - 4th / 1999

41

247

288

1st - 4th / 2000

54

109

163

1st - 4th / 2001

115

124

239

1st - 4th / 2002

107

126

233

TOTAL

363

845

1,207

 

January 1998 through December 2002 Northeast Boise (Area 200) Single-Family Homes Sold consists of the following monthly average by decimal:

 

NEW CONST

EXISTING HOMES

TOTAL LISTING

6.05

14.083

20.116

 

2003

 

“At the end of the First Quarter of 2003, the average price of homes sold in Northeast Boise (Area 200) was $244,497, as compared to the Median price of $227,900. Ada County average price of homes sold at the end of the first three months of 2003 was $164,136, as compared to the median price of $139,800” (Ref. 19).

 

QUARTER/YEAR

NEW CONST

EXISTING HOMES

TOTAL LISTING

1st/2003

25

18

43 (Ref. 19)

2nd/2003

34

44

78 (Ref. 20)

3rd/2003

22

47

69 (Ref. 21)

4th/2003

17

36

53 (Ref. 22)

TOTAL

98

145

243

 

“At the end of the Second Quarter of 2003, the average price of homes sold in Northeast Boise (Area 200) was $258,560, as compared to the Median price of $232,350. Ada County average price of homes sold at the end of the Second Quarter or June 2003 was $164,136, as compared to the median price of $139,800” (Ref. 20).

 

“At the end of the Third Quarter of 2003, the average price of homes sold in Northeast Boise (Area 200) was $224,936, as compared to the Median price of $221,200. Ada County average price of homes sold at the end of the Third Quarter or September 2003 was $178,882, as compared to the median price of $150,000” (Ref. 21).

 

“At the end of the Fourth Quarter of 2003, the average price of homes sold in Northeast Boise (Area 200) was $311,079, as compared to the Median price of $261,150. Ada County average price of homes sold at the end of the Fourth Quarter 2003 was $185,995, as compared to the median price of $155,900” (Ref. 22).

 

First through Fourth Quarter of 2003 Monthly Average total # Single-Family Homes Sold in Northeast Boise (Area 200) by decimal:

 

Ada County

NEW CONST

EXISTING HOMES

TOTAL LISTING

1st to 4th Qtr

8.16

12.08

20.25

 

2004

 

“At the end of the First Quarter of 2004, the average price of homes sold in Northeast Boise (Area 200) was $276,136, as compared to the Median price of $218,000. Ada County average price of homes sold at the end of the first three months of 2004 was $179,925, as compared to the median price of $160,000” (Ref. 23)

 

QUARTER/YEAR

NEW CONST

EXISTING HOMES

TOTAL LISTING

1st Qtr 2004

7

32

39 (Ref. 23)

2nd Qtr 2004

16

51

67 (Ref. 24)

Year End Report 3rd Qtr total listing = difference of 1st, 2nd & 4th Qtr total listing

Not reported

Not reported

204-162=42 (Ref. 25)

4th Qtr 2004

7

49

56 (Ref. 26)

TOTAL

30

132

204

Jan to June = 1st & 2nd Qtr & Sep to Dec = 4th Qtr 2004

New Construction and Existing Homes = 9-months and total listing = 12-months

 

“At the end of the Second Quarter of 2004, the average price of homes sold in Northeast Boise (Area 200) was $289,863, as compared to the Median price of $260,000. Ada County average price of homes sold at the end of the Second Quarter or June 2004 was $191,157, as compared to the median price of $160,000” (Ref. 24) .

 

“At the end of the Third Quarter of 2004, the average price of homes sold in Northeast Boise (Area 200) was _____, as compared to the Median price of _____. Ada County average price of homes sold at the end of the Third Quarter or September 2004 was _____, as compared to the median price of _____” (Ref. 25).

 

“At the end of the Fourth Quarter of 2004, the average price of homes sold in Northeast Boise (Area 200) was $263,603, as compared to the Median price of $244,950.  Ada County average price of homes sold at the end of the Fourth Quarter 2004 was $203,190, as compared to the median price of $170,000” (Ref. 26).

 

First through Fourth Quarters of December 2004 Monthly Average total # Single-Family Homes Sold in Northeast Boise (Area 200) by decimal:

 

Ada County

NEW CONST

EXISTING HOMES

TOTAL LISTING

1st, 2nd & 4th 2004

3.33

14.66

17

Jan to June = 1st & 2nd Qtr & Sep to Dec = 4th Qtr 2004

New Construction and Existing Homes = 9-months and total listing = 12-months

 

January 1998 through December 2004 total # Single-Family Homes Sold in Northeast Boise (Area 200):

 

Ada County

NEW CONST

EXISTING HOMES

TOTAL LISTING

1998

46

239

284

1999

41

247

288

2000

54

109

163

2001

115

124

239

2002

107

126

233

2003

98

145

243

1st, 2nd & 4th 2004

30

132

162

Year End Report 3rd Qtr total listing = difference of 1st, 2nd & 4th Qtr total listing

Not reported

Not reported

204-162=42

TOTAL

491

1,122

1,654

Jan to June = 1st & 2nd Qtr & Sep to Dec = 4th Qtr 2004

New Construction and Exiting Homes total reflects 1998 to 1st, 2nd & 3rd 2004 = 81-months and total listing = 84-months

 

January 1998 through December 2004 Monthly Average total # Single-Family Homes Sold in Northeast Boise (Area 200) by decimal:

 

Ada County

NEW CONST

EXISTING HOMES

TOTAL LISTING

1998 to 2004

6.06

13.85

19.69

Jan to June = 1st & 2nd Qtr & Sep to Dec = 4th Qtr 2004

New Construction and Exiting Homes total reflects 1998 to 1st, 2nd & 3rd 2004 = 81-months and total listing = 84-months

Year End Report 3rd Qtr total listing = difference of 1st, 2nd & 4th Qtr total listing

 

2005

 

“At the end of the First Quarter of 2005, the average price of homes sold in Northeast Boise (Area 200) was $320,897, as compared to the Median price of $266,000. Ada County average price of homes sold at the end of the first three months of 2005 was $204,644, as compared to the median price of $173,500” (Ref. 27).

 

QUARTER/YEAR

NEW CONST

EXISTING HOMES

TOTAL LISTING

1st/2005

Not Reported

Not Reported

34 (Ref. 27)

04/05

Not Reported

Not Reported

21 (Ref. 28)

TOTAL

 

 

55

Total listing = 4-months

 

“During April 2005 the average price of homes sold in Northeast Boise (Area 200) was $280,886, as compared to the Median price of $253,000. Ada County average price of homes sold at the end of the first three months of 2005 was $204,644, as compared to the median price of $176,015” (Ref. 28).

 

January though April 2005 Monthly Average total # Single-Family Homes Sold in Northeast Boise (Area 200) by decimal:

 

Ada County

NEW CONST

EXISTING HOMES

TOTAL LISTING

Jan to Apr 2005

 

 

13.75

Total listing = 4-months

 

January 1998 through April 2005 total # Single-Family Homes Sold in Northeast Boise (Area 200):

 

Ada County

NEW CONST

EXISTING HOMES

TOTAL LISTING

1998

46

239

284

1999

41

247

288

2000

54

109

163

2001

115

124

239

2002

107

126

233

2003

98

145

243

1st, 2nd & 4th 2004

30

132

162

Year End Report 3rd Qtr total listing = difference of 1st, 2nd & 4th Qtr total listing

Not reported

Not reported

204-162=42

1st Qtr /2005

Not reported

Not reported

34

04/05

Not reported

Not reported

21

TOTAL

491

1,122

1,690

Jan to June = 1st & 2nd Qtr & Sep to Dec = 4th Qtr 2004

New Construction and Exiting Homes total reflects 1998 to 1st, 2nd & 3rd 2004 to March 2005 = 84-months and total listing = 88-months

New Construction and Exiting Homes Jan to April 2005 not available

 

January 1998 through April 2005 Monthly Average total # Single-Family Homes Sold in Northeast Boise (Area 200) by decimal:

 

Ada County

NEW CONST

EXISTING HOMES

TOTAL LISTING

1998 to April 2005

6.06

13.85

19.20

Jan to June = 1st & 2nd Qtr & Sep to Dec = 4th Qtr 2004

New Construction and Exiting Homes total reflects 1998 to 1st, 2nd & 3rd 2004 to March 2005 = 84-months and total listing = 88-months

Year End Report 3rd Qtr total listing = difference of 1st, 2nd & 4th Qtr total listing

New Construction and Exiting Homes Jan to April 2005 not available

*January 1998 through April 2005

 

Ada County Residential Home Sales statistics provided by the Intermountain Multiple Listing Services, Inc (IMLS) http://www.intermountainmls.com/rstats/AdaInterface.html 

 

(Ref. 1) http://www.intermountainmls.com/rstats/AdaQtr4.htm

(Ref. 1B) http://www.intermountainmls.com/statistics.html

(Ref. 1C) http://www.intermountainmls.com/statistics.html

(Ref. 2) http://www.intermountainmls.com/rstats/AdaQtr1.htm

(Ref. 3) http://www.intermountainmls.com/rstats/Ada4Q99.htm

(Ref. 4) http://www.intermountainmls.com/rstats/Ada1Q99.htm 

(Ref. 5) http://www.intermountainmls.com/rstats/Ada2Q99.htm 

(Ref. 6) http://www.intermountainmls.com/rstats/Ada3Q99.htm

(Ref. 7) http://www.intermountainmls.com/rstats/Ada1Q00.htm 

(Ref. 8) http://www.intermountainmls.com/rstats/Ada2Q.htm 

(Ref. 9) http://www.intermountainmls.com/rstats/AdaQ3.html 

(Ref. 10) http://www.intermountainmls.com/rstats/ada4q00.html 

(Ref. 11) http://www.intermountainmls.com/rstats/Ada1Q01.html 

(Ref. 12) http://www.intermountainmls.com/rstats/Ada2Q01.pdf 

(Ref. 13) http://www.intermountainmls.com/rstats/Ada3Q01.pdf 

(Ref. 14) http://www.intermountainmls.com/rstats/Ada4Q01.pdf 

(Ref. 15) http://www.intermountainmls.com/rstats/Ada1Q02.pdf

(Ref. 16) http://www.intermountainmls.com/rstats/Ada2Q02.pdf

(Ref. 17) http://www.intermountainmls.com/rstats/Ada3Q02.pdf

(Ref. 18 to 28) http://www.intermountainmls.com/statistics.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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                ENERGY QUEST, former National Energy Efficient Development Inc.

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